Dealing with Depression While Taking on IBD: Louise’s Story

No one feels their best when they are unwell, and this is no different for those with chronic illness. There is an ebb and flow to anything chronic – meaning there are good and bad days – but what happens when your bad days outweigh your good days?

In a Twitter poll I conducted this week asking fellow patients how IBD has impacted their mental health, 40% said they’ve experienced depression and it’s a struggle, while 60% said they’ve dealt with mental health issues from time to time. I found it telling that no one who responded to the poll said their mental health wasn’t impacted at all.

IMG_1807This week a guest post from 31-year-old Louise Helen Hunt from the United Kingdom. She was diagnosed with Crohn’s in 2011 and has undergone four surgeries in the last three years. Louise opens up about her struggles with mental health, while living with IBD and offers incredible perspective and words of wisdom that everyone in our community should be mindful of. I’ll let her take it away…

I hit rock bottom six months into my IBD diagnosis. I struggled to find a treatment plan that worked. This involved months of being in and out of hospital. I tried very hard to be positive, but I was sinking. I refused help, I didn’t want to talk about it and I certainly didn’t want any more medication.

Fast forward to 2018, six years since those first depressive episodes and I was still feeling depressed. I’d gone through two major surgeries very close together, came out with a stoma, struggled with my body image and was starting a new job. It was a stressful time and I was not coping. I needed help.

There are lots of emotions experienced by those who live with IBD, both positive and negative. Depression and anxiety come up often on patient surveys from various sources, rates of depression are higher among IBD patients as compared to the general population.Helen Blog

The balancing act of IBD and Depression

Depression is a serious mood disorder that causes feelings of sadness and loss of interest. Depression can make you feel exhausted, worthless, helpless, and hopeless. It can also make dealing with daily tasks difficult. Tasks associated with managing a chronic illness may even feel insurmountable.

Depression often gets worse if it is not treated. IBD specialists are encouraged to assess not just the physical symptoms, but also the emotional symptoms. These can be:

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood
  • Feelings of hopelessness, negativity
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, helplessness
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and activities that were once enjoyed, including sex
  • Decreased energy, fatigue, being “slowed down”
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering or making decisions
  • Insomnia, early-morning awakening, or oversleeping
  • Loss of appetite, weight loss, or overeating and weight gain
  • Restlessness and irritability

Depression is treatable. It is important to seek out a counsellor who has experience in treating people who live with chronic illness. And while it can take some time for the symptoms of depression to go away, seeking treatment can help improve your mood, your quality of life, and your ability to cope with IBD.

This can be in the form of Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) – an evidence-based treatment for depression and anxiety, it works to identify and change negative thought patterns and behaviours which can contribute to depression – or medication management which can be used in addition to therapy.

How to handle depression when you’re chronically ill

  • Talk to like-minded people – this could be online, at a support group or your friends.
  • Keep a journal – getting your thoughts out of your head can be very taxing but ultimately therapeutic.
  • Take your prescribed medication regularly.
  • Remember there is no shame in needing or taking medication to cope with your symptoms.
  • Be active – whether this is running or going to the gym, even something as simple as a regular walk can help: being outside and feeling grounded – literally – can lessen some of the symptoms of depression.
  • If you are having a crisis, please seek medical attention. Be proactive and pick up the phone.
  • Don’t expect to “snap out of it.” Instead, expect to feel a little better each day.
  • Ask for and accept help from your family and friends.
  • Know that positive thinking will eventually replace negative thinking as your depression responds to treatment.

fullsizeoutput_1edfRemember that feeling better takes time, and that your mood will likely improve gradually, not immediately.

Connect with Louise on social media:

Facebook: Louise Helen Hunt

Instagram: @louisehelenhunt

Twitter: @louisehelenhunt

 

Coping with the fear of loss while living with IBD

It was love at first sight. From the moment he entered the room, I knew there was something special about him. He was shy, yet grabbed the attention of everyone around him. Timid, but gentle. So handsome and regal. His name was Hamilton. He had been sold on the street for $10 by his original owner to little girls in the neighborhood. Their mom brought him into the animal shelter, and he landed a spot on the weekly Humane Society segment on my morning show, desperately looking for a new home. IMG-4343

We went from being strangers to family in a matter of minutes. During that segment, I announced to thousands of viewers tuning in that I was going to adopt this dog. Here I was, 26-years-old, had never owned a dog in my life, but in that split second, he stole my heart and changed my world.

Fast forward nearly 10 years later, and Hamilton James (as I call him), has been my sidekick through the good, the bad, and the ugly. We’ve lived in Wausau, WI, Chicago, Springfield, IL and now St. Louis. Whether it was waking up at 2 a.m. with me when I worked morning shows or cuddling me on the couch during break ups, flare ups and post-surgeries, he’s been such a source of unconditional comfort and happiness in my life.

It’s difficult for me to imagine navigating life with Crohn’s and my day-to-day with my family, without him. Obviously, I knew the time would come—but not this soon. Hamilton has recently started having seizures and breathes laboriously at times. After he took a terrible tumble down 13 stairs last weekend, IMG_4315I took him into the vet and a chest x-ray showed he has congestive heart failure. The vet gave him a day to a year to live. When I saw the size of his enlarged heart in his tiny body, my heart sank. My world stopped. The tears flowed. And immediately, I felt my Crohn’s symptoms return.

Since starting his seizure medication and being put on Lasix (oh joy, a chronic illness dog—just what I need!), he seems very much like his old self—but the thought of what’s to come and knowing his health is not what it used to be, cuts me deeply. He’s my first baby. I can’t fathom what it’s going to be like to wake up and not see him. This week I’ve been struggling with anxious thoughts about what his final moments will be like. Those anxious expectations translate into gnawing pains in my abdomen that last for hours.

A6865E4F-A38B-4277-B771-2BA1F5AAC900As a mom of two and a wife, I know I need to reel it in and start coping so I don’t land myself in the hospital. But, the sadness, stress, and worry only feed my illness. What’s a girl to do? Whether you have a chronic illness or not—losing a four-legged family member is devastating and heart-wrenching.

Here’s helpful advice I’ve received from family members and friends about dealing with the pain of having a sick pet and knowing their days are numbered:

 “One day at a time. Don’t think about losing him, only think about how much you love him and how you have both enhanced each other’s lives. Key point—live in the moment, otherwise, you will make yourself sick and drive yourself crazy.”

“He’s been by your side and comforted you when you were sick, and now it’s your turn to be by his side, comfort him, and make sure he’s not suffering.”

“Exercise and focus on your stomach when you breathe, not your chest. Limit caffeine, alcohol and chocolate.”

“Some local shelters have pet loss support groups if that’s something that might help you.”

“Find a healthy outlet in which you can express your emotions, if you do any kind of mindfulness practice, do it. Stay on top of your symptoms and check in with your doctors often.”

When I think of managing my IBD, Hamilton has been and continues to be a big part of my patient journey.

IMG-4462

Post bowel resection snuggles

Calming my anxiety and coping with the pain that is ahead is not going to be easy and something I know I will continue to struggle with—but in a way it helps to know the reason behind my symptoms and why they may be present.

Much like life with Crohn’s, there’s no sense in waiting for a flare up or a hospitalization to happen. Rather, it’s all about celebrating the good times, taking everything a day at a time, and making the most of the calm before the storm. Instead of dwelling on the inevitable and being miserable, I want to soak up the beauty of the right now. Instead of letting the sadness seep into the remaining days we have together, I want to continue to discover the joy he brings to my life. IMG-4460

I plan to use that perspective and that strength to be a rock for Hamilton and bestow upon him the same love and support he’s given me since we crossed paths that unforgettable January morning on Wake Up Wisconsin.