Another one bites the dust: My latest colonoscopy tips

Save the date, it’s time for your annual colonoscopy! Ugh. From the moment I schedule my scope I make a mental note and the dread and anguish looms over as the day of the procedure grows near. It’s so much more than a procedure to me though. The entire process—from getting the prep, to taking the prep, to getting prepped at the hospital is a painful reminder of my reality. I have Crohn’s disease. A day, not even an hour, usually passes where I don’t think about my chronic illness—but this is a stark reminder that I’m different. Different from other people my age. Different from all the “healthies” in the world.

For me, downing the magnesium citrate is physically painful. The moment I smell it. The moment the disgusting liquid touches my lip, the hair on my arms stands up and I instantly start to dry heave. Then, I remember I have 20 ounces to get down, plus 64 ounces of Miralax mixed with Gatorade…all within a few hours. It’s overwhelming and daunting. 4C27B95A-9514-472E-84F2-70A78A8AC020

If you’ve had a colonoscopy, you get it. The prep is the worst, the procedure is easy. When you live with IBD, the worry about what can be discovered weighs heavily on you. This time around—along with the prep, I had some additional “obstacles”. This time—I was home with my rambunctious (but oh so sweet) 2-year-old and my 6-month-old, while going more than 72 hours on clear liquids. Along with being an IBD mom, I’m breastfeeding. That in and of itself is exhausting and zaps your energy. Nothing like burning 500 calories while you’re not eating!

As patients, each experience throughout our journey impacts us in a unique way and toughens our skin a bit. Each test, each poke and prod, each surgery, desensitizes us. Every person is different, no journey is the same.

But, I want to share a few helpful “work arounds” I used this time.

  1. GUMMY BEARS!! IMG_5276Boys and girls, this is a game changer. Gummy bears are considered a clear liquid because they liquify upon digestion, much like Jello. In the days leading up, you can eat all the colors, but 24 hours before your scope stay away from any red, orange or purple as those colors are not allowed during prep. I used gummy bears to chase the magnesium citrate, two bears for every sip! It was also a nice treat and it felt good to actually chew something after only having liquids for days.
  1. 72-hour liquid diet. This is aggressive, it’s not easy. But, it can be done. I impose this on myself and for years have seen what a difference it makes with my prep. Much less to pass, and if you aren’t able to drink all your prep—less chance of needing to redo the scope.
  1. Daydream about that first meal, eyes on the prize. There’s nothing quite like that first morsel of food you get to eat after your colonoscopy. Use this as a reward and something to look forward to. IMG_5286Look up menus and decide where you want to treat yo’self. Along with that first meal, I try and plan something fun to do. This time around my husband and I went shopping after breakfast and then we went out to dinner and to a light show at the Botanical Gardens (where we got engaged!). Knowing I had that to look forward to, helped me a great deal!
  1. Lean on your village. It’s nearly impossible to go through this process alone. My husband took my toddler out for dinner this week so I wouldn’t need to see them eating or smell food. (Greatly appreciated). My mom flew in from Chicago to take care of my kids the moment I started prep and so that my husband could take me to the procedure. I shared my experience on Instagram and connected with hundreds of people publicly and through private messages. People shared their “tricks”, offered words of encouragement and made me feel empowered. IMG_0913My compassionate little 2-year-old even held my glass of prep with me and didn’t want to leave my side when I went to the bathroom. (lucky him!)
  1. Rather than lemon lime Gatorade, check out the Cherry Frost flavor! I learned this from a virtual friend. The mixture of the Miralax is SO much better this way. Much more palatable and I tolerated it much better. It allows you to enjoy a “red” flavor, without drinking something that is red in color.
  1. If you’re breastfeeding, get ready to pump and dump and supplement if you don’t have a stash in the freezer. The day of the prep, I pumped and dumped and then 24 hours after the procedure you need to do the same, so the anesthesia is out of your system. IMG_5214In the days leading up, my GI recommended I drink whole milk or chocolate milk to get some protein for the baby. (I chose not to do this because my stomach can be sensitive to dairy.) I made sure Sophia got a couple bottles of formula each day, since my breastmilk was probably lacking it’s normal nutrients.
  1. Wear a robe or a dress on prep day. It’s much easier to make a mad dash and not have to pull your pants or shorts on and off every time. I wore a casual summer dress that didn’t press on my stomach or slow me down in the bathroom.

The play-by-play of how this colonoscopy experience measured up to others

Overall, I handled the prep much better than normal. I was able to get about 90% of it down without a problem. I slept four hours and was on the toilet from 2:15-3:30 a.m. At 3:30 a.m. I tried to take the remaining 10 ounces of magnesium citrate. This is where things started going downhill.

Up until this point, I hadn’t shed a tear or vomited. This was a first for me! As soon as I held my nose and started pacing in the darkness of my kitchen as I tried to get it down, I puked in my kitchen sink and started crying. I felt miserable. Exhausted. Nauseous. Weak. I was ready to wave the white flag and just be done with it. When I puked again, I decided I couldn’t take anymore. I was nervous about being cleaned out, but physically and emotionally I had checked out.

As the nurses prepped me for the procedure, I told them about my bad veins and horrible IV experiences. (At one point, during a hospitalization for an abscess the size of a tennis ball, it took 4 people, EIGHT tries to get my IV)…ever since, I have slight PTSD about getting IVs. The nurse grabbed a vein finder and decided to go through my hand. She tried getting four tubes of blood drawn through my IV, but it was making me too weak, it burned, and the blood wasn’t flowing, so they waited to draw labs until after my colonoscopy.

A9483E68-0059-4CA4-94C8-B37217FBF6FDIt’s in these moments where I pause and reflect with positive internal self-talk. I think about family members and friends who inspire me. I pray to God for a smooth procedure and good results. I try and breathe and relax the best I can.

I was worried about whether I was cleaned out enough. My GI rated my prep a “9” on the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS). It’s the scale used to judge the quality of bowel cleanliness and replaces subjective terms such as “excellent”, “good” and “fair”. Three segments of the colon are looked at for this, with the highest rating being a 3. I was pretty pumped to get a 9 this time around, despite throwing up the last 10 ounces of mag citrate! Now, in the future, I’m not going to beat myself up the morning of if I can’t get it down.

Drum roll please…The Results!

Honestly, I could not ask for better results. My ileum and entire colon looked “normal”, no specimens were collected, and I am in mucosal remission. Hearing you’re in remission is amazing, and something I don’t take for granted. I take that word with a grain of salt though. To me, remission is fleeting. It can be robbed from you quickly. I was once told I was in remission after a colonoscopy and then less than a week later, I was hospitalized with a bowel obstruction.

IMG_5282Rather than rely so heavily on achieving remission, focus more on how you feel each day. Are you having more “feel good” days than symptomatic days? Are you able to function and complete tasks personally and professionally without your health getting in the way?

I am sensitive to the fact that many people in the IBD family won’t ever be told they are in remission. It took nine years for me to ever hear that word uttered out of a GI’s mouth. So, trust me, I get it. Don’t beat yourself up over this. Trust in how you feel. You know your body best.