The race for a cure: How clinical trials are taking on COVID-19

Clinical trials are the guiding light when it comes to discovering life-saving medical breakthroughs. Now, more than ever, they are critical for ensuring treatments and vaccines to combat COVID-19 are safe and effective. IMG-9966 Citruslabs is currently offering research organizations their patient recruitment service and software free of charge for COVID-19 trials. Their goal is to make an impact by accelerating the research needed to find a vaccine and treatment for this condition sooner rather than later.

“Without clinical trials, there is no innovation in medicine. Since there is currently no cure or vaccination for COVID-19, it is essential to test potential treatment methods as soon as possible and to speed up the process so that we can slow this virus down and all move on with our lives. We know that patient recruitment is a big issue in the clinical trial industry. We want researchers to do what they do best: conduct research, see patients, and let others, like Citruslabs, worry about patient recruitment,” said Susanne Mitschke, CEO and Co-founder, Citruslabs.

Susanne

Susanne Mitschke, CEO & Co-fonder, Citruslabs

Right now, clinical trials are looking for people infected with coronavirus, as well as healthy individuals. Healthy people are the key group needed for vaccination trials. Currently, there are around 12 different potential treatment methods being tested—finding a cure for people who are already infected with COVID-19 and finding a vaccination that prevents people from getting the virus in the first place.

As you can imagine, aside from COVID-19 trials, the clinical trial world has come to a screeching halt. Patients are scared to come to screenings or continue with their study visits because of COVID-19.

The trials to treat infected COVID-19 patients are targeting the most severe cases and mostly treat ICU patients. Citruslabs isn’t working on those trials, as it’s hard for them to identify patients who are in the ICU. Their expertise lies more so with clinical trials for vaccines.

The race to discover a safe COVID-19 vaccine

Even though clinical trials for COVID-19 are accelerated right now, to ensure a vaccine works and is safe, still takes time. This is why it’s expected a vaccine for COVID-19 won’t be approved until at least March 2021. stay-home-save-lives-4983843_1280

To give you an idea of just how accelerated the race to get a COVID-19 vaccine is, on average clinical trials for vaccines take 10 years! First, research must be done “in vitro”, then, usually the vaccine is tested on animals and the last step is human clinical trials (three phases for FDA approval). Most companies then continue with a Phase 4 trial to collect “real-world evidence” and test the drug with tens of thousands of patients.

“The good news when it comes to COVID-19 is that researchers have investigated other Coronaviruses: SARS (from 2002) and MERS (from 2012). The current Coronavirus has 80-90% similarity to the SARS virus from 2002, which is also why doctors call the virus SARS-COV-2. When it comes to COVID-19, some trials focus on live but weakened virus forms. These have drawbacks because they can still make the host (the human being) sick! Newer approaches are looking at the genetic code of the virus, which seems in light of COVID-19, a safer approach,” explained Susanne.       corona-4983590_1920

COVID-19 Symptom Tracker

Citruslabs is collaborating with other research organizations to find the right patients for clinical trials. One of those companies is Lazarus, which created a symptom tracker to identify those who are likely to have COVID-19. Their software advises patients if they should stay at home (self-monitoring), visit their primary care physician, or even go straight to the hospital. You can find a link to their tracker here.

How to get involved and help

So, what can we do as the general population right now—other than STAY HOME to minimize the spread? Taking part in clinical trials can really save lives, now more than ever. If you are interested in taking part in a clinical trial to find a vaccine for COVID-19, head over to https://bit.ly/2wMS3Ja and fill in your information. A research team will be in touch with you about suitable trials in your area.

The backstory on Citruslabs

Founded in 2015—Citruslabs is the link between patients and research organizations. Their sole focus is to find the right candidates for the right clinical trials. Currently, 86% of clinical trials don’t meet their patient targets. Citruslabs is working tirelessly to change that. When clinical trials can’t be completed it puts researchers in limbo because they are not able to collect enough data to the safety and efficacy of new treatments. As a result, many drugs never make it to market.

As of today, Citruslabs has worked with more than 200 clinical studies and reached more than 3 million patients. But their work is just getting started. Over 50% of Americans are not aware of clinical trials. CitrusLabs

“We want to change this by providing transparent information about the importance of clinical trials, their benefits, but also their risks so that individuals can make an informed decision if they want to join a clinical trial or not,” said Susanne.

In the months to come, stay tuned to Lights, Camera, Crohn’s for more information about how Citruslabs is working to drive research related to Inflammatory Bowel Disease. For now, though—the focus remains on COVID-19 and doing all they can to rise to the challenge and make a difference.

Click here to learn more about how Citruslabs is fighting the fight against COVID-19.

This article was sponsored by Citruslabs. All thoughts and opinions shared are my own.

Real talk from an immune compromised 30-something during the COVID-19 pandemic

You can think of this as a Public Service Announcement for the immune compromised. Like many of my peers in the chronic illness community, I may appear healthy on the exterior, but the biologic medication I depend on to manage my Crohn’s disease, knocks out my immune system. In my family alone, so many face the same reality:

-my 30-year-old cousin whose had two heart transplants and a kidney transplant

-my cousin’s 2.5-year-old son battling Leukemia

-my cousin’s wife who has Crohn’s and is on Remicade

-my cousin who lives with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome among other chronic conditions

I’ve been part of the immune-compromised population since I was 24 years old. Over the past 12 years, never did I dream of the reality we’re currently living in. When I first heard about Coronavirus, I wasn’t all that alarmed. As the conversations and situation continues to become more serious, I’m getting more anxious and concerned.

Here are the latest recommendations shared by The Lancet as this relates to the IBD population. I found these guidelines helpful in drowning out the noise of all the information being thrown our way.

Potential risk factors for infection

  • Patients with IBD on immunosuppressive agents
  • Patients with active IBD and malnutrition
  • Elderly people with IBD
  • IBD patients who frequent medical clinics
  • IBD patients with underlying health conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes
  • Patients with IBD who are pregnant

Medication for patients with IBD

  • Continue current treatment if your disease is stable, and contact your doctor for suitable medicine if you’re flaring.
  • Use mesalamine as prescribed, this should not increase the risk of infection.
  • Corticosteroid use can be continued, but be cautious of side effects.
  • A new prescription of immunosuppressant or an increase in dosage is not recommended in epidemic areas.
  • Use of biologics, such as the anti-TNF’s infliximab (Remicade) and adalimumab (Humira) should be continued.
  • If Remicade infusion is not accessible, switching to a Humira injection is encouraged.
  • Vedolizumab (ENTYVIO) can be continued due to the specificity of the drug for the intestine.
  • Ustenkinumab (Stelara) can be continued, but starting this requires infusion center visits and is not encouraged.
  • Enteral nutrition might be used if biologics are not accessible.
  • Tofacitinib (Xeljanz) should not be newly prescribed unless there are no other alternatives.

Surgery and endoscopy

  • Postpone elective surgery and endoscopy. (I’ve heard of many  centers and hospitals delaying until June at this point.)
  • Screening for COVID-19 (completed blood count, IgM or IgG, nucleic acid detection, and chest CT needed before emergency surgery.

Patients with IBD and fever

  • Contact your GI about visiting an outpatient clinic. Consult with your physician about possibly suspending the use of immunosuppressant and biologic agents and follow appropriate guidance if COVID-19 can’t be ruled out.

While the unknown is scary—as a chronic illness community we need to recognize how well-equipped we are mentally and emotionally to live life during these uncertain and uneasy times. According to the National Health Council, 133 million Americans live with incurable or chronic diseases, many of which are treated with medications that make us susceptible to illness.

It can be unnerving to see peers downplay the severity of the situation and making light of the fact they have nothing to worry about. If you have a friend or family member who’s immune compromised or a loved one over age 60, you have reason to be empathetic. Chances are you know many people who fall in these categories. Going against the recommendation and living your life like nothing is going on right now, puts people like me and so many others in jeopardy. It’s irresponsible and says a great deal about your character. CCFA social distance

To those of us in the high-risk category, this quarantining and social distancing is more than an inconvenience or a change in our plans. We know that if we happen to come down with COVID-19, our bodies may not be able to fight it.

The healthy are getting a glimpse into what it feels like to live with a disease that can blindside you and flip your world upside down at any moment. After years of juggling all the variables and the what-ifs, we know how to protect ourselves. We know living in fear takes away from our joy. Thanksgiving2019

Rather than feel like we’re less than, we can continue to choose to see the beauty of what is right in front of us within our homes, with those who matter most.

Rather than feel like we’re goners, we can follow our care team’s recommendations, pay attention to facts over fake news, and stay on our medication. It’s believed the threat of untreated IBD is a bigger concern right now, and if you flare and need steroids, your immune system will take even more of a hit. If you are flaring and have a fever, physicians are now ruling COVID-19 out first.

Rather than waiting for the worst, we can be proactive and use the tools in our arsenal to stay as healthy as possible and use trusted resources to guide our decision making. Wash your hands even more than you’re used to, spend time outside in your yard, never share food or drink, change your clothes if you’ve left the house.

Rather than glue ourselves to the TV or scroll through our phones, we can take time for ourselves and make a point to make self-care a priority. Put your phone in another room, turn up the tunes and have a dance party with your kids. You’ll be amazed at what a stress reliever that is! Read a good book. Organize your closet. Try out a new recipe or bake something yummy.

Rather than cower in the corner, we can continue to advocate and be a voice for the voiceless in our community to educate and inform the rest of the population about what it means to be immune compromised by connecting over social media, Facetime, Marco Polo, emailing and texting.

Here are some helpful resources to check out:

Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation

Coronavirus and IBD Reporting Registry

International Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Coronavirus Resource and Planning for IBD Patients (Blog written by IBD advocate Jessica Caron)

Coronavirus Resources for People with IBD (Blog/Podcast created by IBD Advocate Amber Tresca)

USA Today article: The best thing everyday Americans can do to fight coronavirus? #StayHome, save lives