IBD on the College Campus: Getting the Medical Logistics in Check

Moving away from home and embarking on a college career is bittersweet. You’re excited. You’re anxious. You’re curious. So many emotions. The world is your oyster and you quickly discover what a small fish you are in this big world. For those entering college with an IBD diagnosis, life comes with many more challenges and fears. Medical concerns are a biggie. You are often forced to find an entirely new GI and care team that is local, in case you flare. You may have always counted on your parents to do your injections, now you may have to do them on your own. If you get infusions, you’ll need to find a new place to receive your medication, that may be out of your comfort zone and be complicated due to your course schedule.

That lack of comfort and consistency in care with a GI you know and have built trust with can be a scary chapter in your patient journey. IMG-0902Jennifer Badura’s son was diagnosed with Crohn’s while in high school. As a parent, she found her son’s transition to college challenging.

“It’s difficult to find a new place for getting lab work completed and a new place for infusions. Getting insurance, prior approvals, etc. along with the unknowns and anxiety about going to a new place for treatments and trying to get everything scheduled is tough.”

Dr Fu

Nancy Fu, BSc.(Pharm). MD. MHSc. FRCP(c), University of British Columbia

is a GI based in Vancouver, with research interests in IBD, infection and adolescent transition. She recommends making sure your primary GI connects you with a GI close to where you are attending school in case a flare requires urgent assessment.

“As a GI who sees adolescents, I make sure I am at least electronically available for my patients via texts or emails. Studies have shown young adults prefer to communicate via email as opposed to over the phone.”

Other recommendations that may be of help to you:

Get acclimated. Set up an appointment with a GI local to campus over the summer months or at the beginning of the school year, so you can build a solid relationship with a new physician. Keep your “hometown” GI’s number in your phone in case you’re flaring, hospitalized, or if your current GI has a question. hospital-840135_1920Use the patient portal to your advantage. Never hesitate to reach out if you have a question or medical issue going on. Listen to your body’s signals and don’t wait until it’s too late.

Make sure you remain compliant and manage your disease. Have enough medication on hand and have a game plan in place for how you’ll receive refills—whether it’s your parents bringing your prescriptions to you, mailing them to you, or you physically picking your medication up from a nearby pharmacy. laboratory-313864_1920Set reminders in your phone or utilize apps that track your symptoms and whether you’ve taken your medication.

Keep your prescriptions in a safe, undisclosed place. Let’s keep it real. Chances are there will be someone on your floor or even a roommate who may want to get their hands on your prescriptions, specifically your pain medications. Don’t flaunt them. Keep them hidden. Count your pills each day if you need to.

Discover local support and build a new support community. Being away from home and away from your personal support network is daunting. Check out the local Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation chapter near your campus and connect with local people who understand your reality. See if new friends from campus want to join you for a local IBD charity event. Not only will this be uplifting for you, but it will open their eyes and give them a bit of perspective about what life with IBD entails.

Click here to check out IBD on the College Campus: The Challenge of Academics.