Cooking in Quarantine: Recipes we’ve found and loved

Cooking during quarantine has taken mealtime and meal prep to a whole new level. Like many people, I constantly feel like I’m thinking about what I’m going to feed myself and my family and it feels like I spend the other time doing dishes. As an immunocompromised IBD mom of two little ones, I’ve used these past few months to be a bit more resourceful in the kitchen.

Prior to the pandemic, I wasn’t the most adventurous. I had my 10-15 “go-to” recipes and never really branched out. While these past few months have been physically, mentally, and emotionally taxing, I’ve found spending some time in the kitchen, while listening to music, is a sweet distraction amongst the unknown chaos going on outside our home.

Since March 12th (102 days!), we have had take-out four times. So, as you can imagine, I’ve had to get creative with my cooking!

NOTE: These recipes do not follow one specific IBD or autoimmune “diet”. I am always hesitant to talk food, as each and every person has unique dietary needs and is able to tolerate food groups differently. If there was one way of eating that was a magic bullet for IBD, we’d all be following it. The best advice I can give when it comes to diet, is to keep a food journal and see what your individual triggers are.

Here are my favorite recipes I’ve found online since quarantine, that have been a hit in the Hayden household:

  1. Slow Cooker Chili. I’ve tried four different recipes these last few months and this one was our favorite. Since my kids are 3-years-old and 17 months, I did not add the hot sauce.
  2. Crispy Chicken. This is SO delicious, but heavy on the calorie count. (Worth it in my opinion!) Made for great leftovers, too. The pasta is to die for.
  3. Slow Cooker Greek Chicken Gyros with Homemade Tzatziki. You guys. As a Greek girl, I more than approved. The tzatziki sauce was fantastic.
  4. Slow Cooker Chicken and Rice. Super simple recipe. I make this with crescent rolls and green beans. Bonus: Makes the house smell great.
  5. One-pot Sausage and Peppers Pasta. Yummy meal, hits all the food groups, with minimal dishes. That’s a win! IMG-3692
  6. Crockpot Pulled Pork. So simple and so tasty. We pair up the meat with Hawaiian rolls and Bread and Butter pickles.
  1. Salsa Fresca Chicken Bake Recipe. I’ve always been a fan of making casserole-type dishes where you put everything together, put the dish in the oven, and that’s it!
  1. Slow Cooker Shredded Chicken Tacos + Mexican Rice Casserole. We’re big fans of Mexican food. These paired up great together along with all the toppings (tomatoes, cheese, sour cream, avocado, lettuce).
  1. Crispy Breaded Pork Chops. + Warm Cinnamon Apples. I’m usually not a huge fan of pork chops, but this meal is good. I usually make green beans for the side. IMG-2680
  1. Ground Beef Taco Casserole. Like I said above, we’re all about Mexican food. My husband loved this one.
  1. Mediterranean Rice Bowls. I found this recipe last year in a Women’s Day magazine and it has been one of our absolute favorites as of late. You can make this with lamb or beef, we’ve only done beef so far. I also buy mini pita breads to go with this. If you don’t have cucumber or don’t like it, I’ve made this with green bell peppers as well. I couldn’t find the recipe online—so I’ll share it here.

Ingredients:

1 lemon

2 tbsp. olive oil (divided)

2 cloves of garlic (I only use one clove)

4 cups of cooked long-grain rice

1 tsp ground cumin

½ tsp ground coriander

1 pint of cherry tomatoes halved

½ a seedless cucumber, cut into ¼ in. pieces

¼ cup of fresh mint

Crumbled feta, for serving

(I tweaked the directions a bit, so I’ll share how I make this)

  1. Make rice according to the box (will take 25 min. so start this first)
  2. Chop the tomatoes, cucumbers, garlic, and mint and put to the side.
  3. Finely grate zest of lemon, then cut lemon in half. Heat 1 tbsp. of olive oil in a large nonstick skillet on medium-high. Add beef and cook, breaking up with a spoon, until browned. (Once browned, discard fat). Add garlic and ¼ tsp of salt and pepper and cook, stirring 1 minute, toss with lemon zest. Transfer beef to a bowl and squeeze juice of 1 lemon half on top.
  4. Once rice is done cooking add it to the bowl with the beef and season with cumin, coriander, and ¼ tsp of salt and pepper.
  5. Squeeze juice from the remaining lemon half into a medium bowl. Toss with chopped tomatoes, cucumbers, and ¼ tsp of salt and pepper. Fold in the mint.
  6. Add the mixture to the beef and rice and top with crumbled feta. ENJOY! IMG-3693

Bonus recipe: While we were visiting the Lake of the Ozarks recently, I created a salad that is simple and delicious:

Butter lettuce

Chopped apples (I use Honeycrisp)

Chopped strawberries

Chopped grapes

Feta Cheese

Pecans (or whatever nut you’d like to add)

Honey Mustard dressing

Four IBD Physicians Talk COVID: What You Need to Know

Since the words “quarantine”, “self-distancing”, and “COVID-19” became a regular part of our vocabulary three months ago, there have been many fears, and a lot of gray areas for everyone, especially chronic illness patients on immunosuppressive therapies. I had a chance to connect with well-respected and prominent physician voices in the IBD community to get to the bottom of what we need to be doing right now, and how to best handle the days and months ahead.

One of the most common questions—who is at most risk in the IBD population for getting COVID-19? You may be surprised at the findings and discourse.

“We have been reassured that with the exception of steroids, patients with IBD are not at increased risk for bad outcomes with COVID. The risks are similar to the rest of the population,” explained Dr. David Rubin, MD, Professor and Chief of GI, The University of Chicago Medicine. “Older age, co-morbid conditions like obesity, diabetes or other medical problems, and smoking cigarettes put patients at increased risk.” COVIDarticle

Every study and case series has demonstrated NO increased risk for infection, COVID, or bad outcomes with biological therapies. This includes the work of the international registry (COVIDIBD.org and now published in Gastroenterology), the mixed immune patients of all kinds reported from NYU in the New England Journal of Medicine, and other series from Italy and China.

“We have good data now that IBD patients, even those on immunosuppressive therapies are not at increased risk of COVID. However, getting sick with COVID might mean holding off IBD meds, which could potentially trigger a flare,” said Dr. Aline Charabaty, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Clinical Director of the GI Division, Director of the Center for IBD, John Hopkins School of Medicine at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington D.C.

Don’t let your guard down

Dr. Charabaty advises everyone to continue to exercise common sense and be cautious for the upcoming months, otherwise we are at a risk of a second wave of COVID-19.

“Follow responsible physical distancing: avoid unnecessary travel, work from home if possible, and minimize outings in crowded places. Continue to wear a mask, wash hands/use disinfectant, in other words continue to follow COVID-19 precautions when out, or if you have to go to work.  The risk of exposure depends on the incidence of COVID-19 in an area, but also feeling overconfident in an area of low incidence can lead to unnecessary exposure,” she added. coronavirus-4937226_1280

Dr. Peter Higgins, MD, PhD, M.Sc., Director of IBD program, University of Michigan, recommends patients on steroids continue to stay home and avoid outside contact, but for patients not on steroids, the outdoors with a mask, away from crowds, can be therapeutic.

“The hard part is knowing when there will be crowds of people, and avoiding dense gatherings,” Dr. Higgins said. “Having open space and good airflow seems to be protective. Being in close quarters, especially with folks who are breathing hard (exercise, singing) seems to increase risk.”

Small Gatherings with friends and family (less than 10 people)

Dr Charabaty recommends the following:

  • Before gathering with family, make sure no one has had recent symptoms or exposure to someone who has tested positive.
  • When indoors with family staying 6 feet apart isn’t always feasible, wash your hands frequently and wear a mask if sitting close.
  • The idea is to share fun family moments, but remain cautious and protect yourself and loved ones.

“I would limit the number for gathering based on how much space you are entertaining in. Certainly, the more people there are, the more limited the physical space per individual there is to share,” said Dr. Neilanjan Nandi, MD, FACP, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. “With that in mind, I would ask people to not invite more people than they can physically safely distance themselves from. If we’re too close, we spread the virus. If we have distance, then we decrease the odds.”

Luckily, the summer months are perfect for outdoor festivities and gatherings with friends and family. Being indoors in close quarters is taking a calculated risk. It’s hard to know if everyone at a gathering is uninfected without a lot more testing or strict quarantine from every visitor beforehand.

Outdoor patio seating, should you, or shouldn’t you?

The waters get a bit murky here. The consensus is to get takeout and find a picnic spot far from others or to eat at home.

Dr. Charabaty says she tells patients and her family to avoid or limit outdoor dining. She explains, “It’s difficult for people handling and serving food to follow hand washing and social distancing when service is busy. I see many restaurant workers wearing gloves, and touching many different services, which gives a false sense of security. It’s not the cooked food that is an issue, it’s more the handling of the plates, glasses, and silverware.” Outdoor dining

Be mindful of how far tables are spaced out and call ahead to see what measures the restaurant is taking before you go.

Health pundits have pointed out that bathrooms are a point of contact for any infection to be transmitted. This is something to keep in mind, especially for those of us with IBD, who may need to frequent the bathroom more than most. “Hand dryers may aerosolize, and toilet flushes can create microscopic fecal plumes,” says Dr. Nandi. “Notably, coronavirus is present in stool at magnitudes lower than respiratory droplets, so their impact on developing clinically relevant disease is unknown. It is restaurant goers who are coughing and sneezing and then using the bathroom that may cause more concern. If you need to use the bathroom while out, use paper towels and close the toilet lid when flushing.”

Navigating everything from medical appointments to hair cuts

“I understand people wanting to go to hair salon; if you need to , and no one in your house can cut or color your hair, call ahead to make an appointment to minimize wait and exposure, and pick a day and time that are not busy,” said Dr. Charabaty. “If your visit to the physician is routine, you can discuss with your physician how soon you need to be seen. If it’s a sick appointment or a follow-up that you already needed to delay, then again, wear your mask, remove it only when needed; and wash your hands often.”

Before You Go: Ask medical offices and salons what precautions they are taking:

  • Does the office call patients ahead of time to check if they have symptoms suspicious of COVID?
  • What measures are being taken in waiting rooms?
  • Is everyone required to wear a mask?
  • Ideally you want to see lots of free, no-questions-asked testing in your local community/county to monitor COVID rates
  • A low level of new cases (less than 3 per week) in your local county
  • Lots of serious precautions taken, including possibly outdoor haircuts (common during 1918 flu pandemic), fans to increase airflow, and glove, gown, mask, and face shields on stylist/dentist/eye doctor to protect them as well as you. Recent exposures in Missouri reinforce this.

The future of telehealth

“I expect telehealth will continue- our estimate is that about 30-40% of routine visits may be virtual which is great, but this needs some careful reflection,” explained Dr. Rubin. “We need some thoughts and plans for better home monitoring and some additional guardrails to know when in person visits are needed and when providers or patients should request them. We don’t want to make mistakes and let patients slip through the cracks of virtual visits without physical examinations and adequate disease and therapy monitoring.”

The return to work

Ways to minimize exposure in the workplace and the questions to ask:

  • What measures is your employer taking to ensure responsible physical distancing?
  • Are employees required to wear a mask?
  • If working outside the home, leave clothes and shoes in the garage or the basement. Strip down and scrub down right when you get home.
  • If spouse has symptoms or if they’ve traveled to a high-risk area, they should quarantine.
  • Ask your boss if you can continue to work from home or increase the frequency of doing so to limit your exposure. Provide a note from your GI to Human Resources that explains why you are immunocompromised.
  • Monitor yourself or your spouse closely for fever, symptoms (including both respiratory and GI symptoms) and if possible, pulse oximetry to measure blood oxygen levels (a decrease is worrisome).

Dr. Higgins explains there are “high and low” risks work environments. High risk involves a crowded open space office full of cubicles, working in an ER/ICU/healthcare, assembly line/meatpacking plant, air travel, frequent contact with large numbers of people (bus driver). Lower risk jobs involve outdoor work, low density office spaces with closed doors/good airflow, and solo car travel. photo-1531493731235-b5c309dca387

“When it comes to spouse related travel, I would have them again speak with their employer about the necessity and yield of the trip. Much of what we can do currently can be done via teleconferencing,” said Dr. Nandi. “While the personal touch is always preferred, today’s times do necessitate that we be conservative and protect ourselves and our families. If travel is necessary, the spouse testing upon return is a good idea. If not possible, then conservatively a self-quarantine would be recommended. Of course, this presents marked strain on the functionality of any family. this emphasizes the need for greater and better testing capability.”

Remain cautious, don’t get too comfortable

Even with states re-opening, it’s on us to remain cautious and minimize unnecessary exposure while being able to provide for our families. We all have cabin fever going on, but we are all responsible to prevent a second wave of COVID by avoiding being complaisant.

“While it is reassuring to know that in general our patients with IBD do as well as the general population (or possibly better), it is prudent to continue our caution until we get to an R0 of <1.0 (meaning one infected person infects less than one additional person) by ongoing efforts to flatten the curve and/or a vaccine,” says Dr. Rubin. coronavirus-line-art-5019475_1280

This too shall pass

“It is sad and frustrating that this pandemic has occurred in our society, but I view it as a unique opportunity to get better connected: first with one’s self ; second with our immediate family and friends and third, with our natural environment,” said Dr. Nandi. “In my opinion, our Western society’s luxuries can often prevent us from enjoying the simplest pleasures in life. Thus, I take this time as an opportunity to spend quality time with my family, read more books, try new recipes, and workout more regularly. Because, I know in time, this too shall pass – and the opportunity that it presents will disappear as well.”

 

You are not a burden if you have IBD

When I was 21, in the matter of one week I received an IBD diagnosis and had my heart broken. My boyfriend from college who had previously treated me like a queen, never visited me in the hospital and broke up with me the day I returned home.

I’ll always remember walking into my parent’s bedroom and telling my mom about the break-up. My body frail. My arms battered with bright purple bruises up and down. The weight of a lifelong disease and 22 pills a day hitting me head-on with every emotion possible. My mom’s response, “Well, you’re not perfect in his eyes anymore.”

From that point forward, I worried about the invisible Scarlet Letter of my illness and how it would impact my love life.

Would a man ever be able to love me, for all of me? Crohn’s and all?

You are not a burden.

The recent advice column shared in the New York Times entitled, “Is it Ok to Dump Him Because of His Medical Condition,” plays into every fear and every worry IBD patients grapple with. While Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis can happen at any age, people are more frequently diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 35. Finding out you have a chronic disease with no cure in those youthful years of life—often prior to finding a life partner or starting a career path, is incredibly overwhelming. The fear of the future and what is to come with your hopes and dreams is nearly debilitating at times.

So, it’s pretty freaking ironic when the author of “The Ethicist” who considers “readers’ ethical quandaries” responds back to this question about breaking up with someone because they have Crohn’s by saying:

“Committing to this person may be committing to a life as a caregiver”… and… “You don’t owe it to anyone to accept that burden.”

You are not a burden.

not a burden2Referring to people with any chronic illness or disabilities in this way is not only hurtful, but extremely ableist. You can’t assume everyone with IBD is going to need a caregiver in a partner. If the author had any idea about how Crohn’s manifests, he would know that the disease is a rollercoaster…oftentimes years of being able to manage, followed by hardships, setbacks, and flares and back again.

As a 36-year-old married woman and mom of two, I have referred to my husband as a caregiver, but he’s more so my source of support and someone who sees me for much more than my disease. He would never think of me as a burden. He would never have considered breaking up with me because life could get complicated with my disease. He sees my disease as a part of who I am, but recognizes I am so much more. not a burden 3

You are not a burden.

To the 25-year-old single girl with ulcerative colitis reading this. To the parent of the child with IBD worried about whether their little one will ever find love as an adult. To the guy being talked about in the NYT article who most likely was broken up with—believe this:

You will meet people who turn a cheek once they find out you have IBD or suddenly show disinterest. It sucks in the moment. It feels like you’re getting punched in the gut. But use that pain to recognize that type of person isn’t meant to be your person. Take that heartbreak and use it to your advantage. Set you bar high. Settle for no one. Use your disease to shed light on people’s true colors. Who is going to be there when the going gets tough? Who lifts you up when you’re too weak to stand on your own? Who sees strength in your vulnerability with your health and the way you take on life? your are not a burden5

You are not a burden.

I’ve had Crohn’s for 15 years (next month!). Last night I needed to take a pain pill to quiet the gnawing pain in my abdomen. This morning I had to make a fast dash to the bathroom multiple times in front of my husband and in-laws while my kids needed tending to. I apologized for needing to go to the bathroom so many times. Even as a veteran patient who’s four years into marriage with a man who loves me unconditionally, the words of that damn article rang out in my mind. I felt the guilt and wonder creep in….am I a burden?!

No matter how long you have IBD, no matter how well you have it managed, there are still moments where you feel less than your peers. There are still moments you can’t keep up. There are still moments if you wonder whether you are enough.

Just remind yourself…and I promise to do the same…YOU ARE NOT A BURDEN. And shame on you New York Times…as a journalist, I expect more. And so do your readers.

IBD does not just look like me

Like most people, the events of the past week have left me feeling upset, angry, frustrated, helpless, and at a loss for words. As a white woman I recognize my privilege and the need for change. I recognize that I can’t begin to imagine what it’s like to walk in the shoes of a black man, woman, or child.

As an IBD advocate I understand that Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis do not discriminate. These diseases don’t care what color, race, ethnicity, or gender you are. Oftentimes though, the lists for blogs, advocates to check out, interviews, or accolades, tend to feature people like me. When I scroll through these lists and see all white advocates it makes me uncomfortable. IBD looks like meWhen I’m part of a photo grid holding up a sign alongside fellow advocates…and it’s a bunch of white girls, it makes me feel out of touch.

Over the years, I’ve heard from black patients who are friends of mine, who have dealt with delayed diagnoses because of mistrust from physicians. I’ve heard of black patients being looked at as opioid-seekers, despite rarely going to the ER for their symptoms. IMG_8619

I want to make sure you know and are familiar with some ROCKSTAR female advocates who do a phenomenal job of being a voice for not only the IBD community, but the black community. Here are their names and their Instagram handles.

Brooke Abbott                @crazycreolemama and @IBDmoms

Shawn Bethea                 @shawnbethea_ and @crohnsandstuff

Gaylyn Henderson         @gutlessandglamorous and @gaylyn14

Myisha King                     @gameofcrohnsandchronicillness

Sonya Goins                     @sonya_goins

Melodie Blackwell          @melodienblackwell

Shermel Maddox            @shermel2

Chelsey Leanne               @chelseyleannibd

We’ve all had people in our lives try and understand what it’s like to live with IBD when they don’t have it. Through my nearly 15 years with Crohn’s, I’ve experienced the instant connection that occurs when you meet someone online or in person who understands your reality. ShawnThere’s a level of empathy and understanding that makes you feel like you are home.

In this instance, I’m not going to try and act like I fully grasp or understand what it’s like to be black with IBD. It’s important for our community to have role models who look like themselves to connect with, learn from, and admire. Especially the newly diagnosed and pediatric patients. IMG-2348

IBD is not black and white. IBD is all of us. Holding hands through this. Lifting one another up. Doing better at loving and accepting others. Making an effort to be anti-racism each and every day. Teaching our children to see the world and others with a different understanding. This is on us. We must be better.

IBD does not just look like me.

From one IBD mom to another…here are some resources to check out:

Children’s books to support conversations on race

Your Kids Aren’t Too Young to Talk About Race: Resource Roundup

Anti-racism Resources for White People

An Anti-racist Reading list (for adults)

Anti-Racism Activism Resources, Education, Stories, Books, and More

Wondering how you can make a meaningful impact? Tune in for a Facebook Live Tuesday, June 2 at 6 pm CT on the CrohnsandStuff Facebook page.

IMG-2352

 

5 Ways to Make Money At Home In The COVID-19 Era

The way we work looks a lot differently these days than months prior. Chances are the COVID-19 pandemic has forced you to work from home, put your job on hold, or be out on the frontlines. Whatever the case may be, there are ways to adapt to these challenging times to help make ends meet. This week—a guest post from Annelise Bretthauer, a certified Financial Planner who also has Crohn’s disease. IMG_0834She offers up some invaluable advice about freelancing and educating yourself about opportunities that are right at your fingertips.

The gig economy has opened up opportunities to make money in a variety of new ways but many of these jobs are not conducive to our IBD community nor COVID-19. Although, driving for Uber or making grocery runs for Instacart offers great flexibility with work hours, it doesn’t meet our IBD needs and puts our immunocompromised community at risk. Thinking about what was available yesterday can blind us from what is available today and what might be available tomorrow. With every struggle and every hurdle comes a silver lining. We just need to know where to look.

The world will never truly be the same after COVID-19 and with that will come new opportunities. New opportunities for even more flexible work that is better suited to our IBD community. Opportunities our IBD community is uniquely prepared for.

We already know how to work from home productively. We already know how to manage hard times and keep going. We already know how to overcome daily challenges and find ways to keep our mental state healthy. We’ve been strengthening our creativity and time management muscles for years. We are strong and have developed a comfort with being vulnerable that allows us to show up in non-traditional ways that our peers cannot. To quote Brené Brown, we are masters at “being in the arena.” IMG_2273

We are wildly adaptable and we’ve already learned to find a community online and make deep connections without ever sitting face to face.

All of these things put our IBD community at the top of the talent pool when it comes to the new jobs that will be created (or established jobs that will evolve) through this crisis. Keep your eye out and your ears open. This list of 5 creative and flexible IBD friendly ways to make money at home is just the beginning!

#1: For The Typing Expert:

Write Transcripts for Audio Files

This job is ideal for those who already spends much of their day on the computer and can type quickly without error. You can make $0.25 – $2.50 per audio/video minute, which translates to ~$15-$25 per hour.

Here are a couple places to go to get started:

#2: For The Person Who Is Happy To Invest In More Education To Make A Bit More Money:

Become A Remote Tax Preparer

This job is ideal for someone who is detail oriented and thinks they could get behind making tax preparation fun and engaging. Once you complete the education (there are some costs associated with doing this) and become certified for tax preparation, you could make up to $100 per hour.

Here are a couple places to go to get started:

#3: For The Computer Wiz:

Get paid to test others websites for usability and content.

This job is ideal for those who can’t stand when a website is hard to navigate and has lots of ideas for how they could make it better. There is quite a range in pay per test (~$5-$90) but it iron’s out to an average pay of around ~$20 per hour.

Here are a couple places to go to get started:

#4: For The Person Who Loves Crossing All The T’s & Dotting All The I’s:

Become an Online Remote Notary (available in in 23 states)

This job is ideal for someone who is detail oriented and enjoys the process of making sure everything is done correctly. Although each state differs in what you are legally allowed to charge for notary services, in most states the maximum is $25 per notarization.

Here is where to go to get started:

#5: For The Early Riser or Night Owl Who Prefers Working Odd Hours:

Teach English Online

This job is ideal for someone who likes to be up early or stays up late. That is because many of the jobs are teaching English to foreigners in different time zones. Please note, many sites require a bachelor’s degree and a TEFL teaching certificate. The pay does vary significantly but most sites pay between $10-$26 per hour.

Here are a couple places to go to get started:

  • Magic Ears (need TEFL teaching certification + bachelor’s degree)
  • VIPKid (Platform offers TEFL certification but you will need a bachelor’s degree)
  • ET Teach Online (need TEFL teaching certification + bachelor’s degree)
  • Cambly (no experience needed)

If none of the options above speak to you or you aren’t sure where to start, check out Chronically Capable. Chronically Capable is a job site designed only for those with chronic illness. You can browse for jobs that have already been pre-screened by their team – pretty awesome huh!? IMG_7756

From one IBD warrior to another, don’t ever lose sight of your worth. Your skills and your adaptability will rise to the top of the talent pool. We can’t pour from an empty cup, so remind yourself that self-care is other’s care.

If you’ve ever been curious about how others make, save and spend their money, feel free to check out Annelise’s podcast, This American Wallet. She interviews different people from different walks of life about money. Available for a listen on Apple podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or Google Podcasts.  

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only and is not to be taken as advice of any kind. All pay estimates were made in best efforts given the informational available via each company website.

 

My family calls me “Sergeant COVID”: Navigating life while being high-risk, as the world reopens

I’m preparing to feel like the bad guy in the months ahead. My family has already jokingly called me “Sergeant COVID”.  As an IBD mom who is immunocompromised, the decisions I make as the world starts to reopen may step on some toes. I’ve always been one to struggle with confrontation and take it upon myself to be a people-pleaser, which isn’t always a good thing. But this. This is different. I know there will be times I need to speak up and say no.

While out on a walk with my family in our neighborhood this week, we approached a house with two moms sitting side by side, a play date was going down.

sophiawalk15months

Daily walks and getting fresh air help to keep us sane!

Several kids ran around the yard. An SUV parked next to the two moms with their thermoses. I turned to my husband when I spotted them and said, “well there’s a playdate.” He laughed and said, “Are you not going to allow Reid and Sophia to see anyone for a year?”

Well, that’s a good question my friends. Who knows what these next few months will bring, and as someone who is immunocompromised from my biologic medication, that may need to be the reality if things don’t make a drastic turnaround for the better as far as number of cases and deaths.

I want to be together with my friends and family as much as the next person

I also understand the risk associated with getting together with people who have not taken social distancing and quarantine as strictly as my family has. I haven’t stayed in my house and neighborhood since March 12th and only ventured to the grocery store and for bloodwork once, to throw those efforts out the window. I haven’t cooked every meal for my family and refrained from ordering take out for nothing.

baking

Trying lots of new recipes has been a great distraction.

The moment I let my guard down before I feel comfortable, the moment I put myself or my family at risk.

As someone who’s worried about sickness from germs and flare-ups for years, I see this pandemic through a different lens than many. Anyone in the IBD community who is on immunosuppressive medication has a different perspective. I’m already anxious about having to justify my decisions to stay home as life slowly starts getting back to a new normal for everyone. But until I feel safe, we’ll be taking all the precautions.

I wonder just as much as the next person in the chronic illness community how to navigate these difficult conversations with well-meaning and otherwise “healthy” friends and family. When I hear about people getting together indoors, going for walks with people outside their nuclear family, having people over for BBQs, even being essential workers (which I know can’t be helped)—I know the date I’ll see those friends and family just gets pushed further away.

When things calm down, the first people my kids and I will see indoors, will be my parents, who have practiced strict social distancing and haven’t ventured out for anything but groceries. If they were out and about and seeing others, that wouldn’t be the case.

We all need to do what we feel comfortable with and worry less about hurting someone’s feelings or getting a little backlash for our decisions. Luckily, my husband Bobby has been extremely understanding and supportive and backs me up on how I feel. IMG-1529

The best thing we can do is over-communicate. Talk openly about life as someone who is immunocompromised and what recommendations and parameters around social distancing your care team has shared with you. By talking about what your doctor has told you, it validates your worries and fears.

It’s ok to feel disappointed and frustrated. Not everyone has been or will take social distancing and quarantining as seriously as you do. Focus on what you can control—and that is your actions and that of your families. You are doing all that you can to stay safe, and that’s what matters. I’ve had moments where I was physically shaking and so overwhelmed by emotions throughout these past few weeks—because of the actions of others. You see it on social media—the families getting together with several people for Easter, and birthdays, and Mother’s Day. People taking trips on airplanes. Social distancing block parties where people are all standing super close to one another. It’s truly mind-boggling and hard not be judgmental from my vantage point. If you need to cut down on social media or cut ties temporarily with those who you believe are acting irresponsibility, do what you need to do for your mental health and well-being.

We had originally planned to drop off my mother-in-law’s Mother’s Day gifts on the front porch and stay in our car, but my in-laws set up patio furniture on opposite sides of their large patio and we were able to hang out outside 20+ feet apart to exchange presents. It was nice to finally see one another from afar vs. through a window.

Constantly keep your finger on the pulse of research. There are so many physicians in the IBD community truthfully working around the clock to bring patients like us the latest and newest information about COVID-19 as it relates to Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis. Educate yourself on factual, research-based information. Follow top GI doctors on Twitter. Stay in touch with your care team and don’t hesitate to ask questions. Tune in for Facebook Lives and Twitter Chats from IBD Social Circle, IBD Moms, and many other great groups.

Lean on the patient community. Prior to the pandemic, life with a chronic illness already made us feel a bit like outsiders. IMG-1409Now more than ever, we’re being labeled as the “sickly”, the “disposable”, the “weak”, the list goes on. COVID-19 is not JUST about the elderly and immunocompromised, this is about everyone. As patients we have a unique perspective and understanding about the struggles we face daily and what it’s like to go through this challenging time. Connect with fellow patients online who get your reality, your emotion, and the whirlwind of going up against this invisible bogeyman. To refrain from social media, you can download awesome free apps like Gali Health and IBD Healthline, with helpful articles, community conversations, and chats by patients, for patients.

Your FOMO is nothing new. Chances are throughout your patient journey you’ve had to miss out on plans or cancel last minute. Will it be hard when the whole family or your group of friends are getting together, and you tell them you won’t be joining for the big “post-quarantine” reunion? YES. Of course. At the same time, you’ll probably feel comforted not having to worry if so and so is asymptomatic and waiting on pins and needles for two weeks to see if you’re in the clear.

I look so forward to the day when my family and I can reunite with those we love and miss dearly. I just ask that people have understanding, patience, and empathy for those like myself, who will be very fearful to return to life as we used to know it…if that will ever be. Maybe put on the kid gloves and imagine walking in our shoes before you say something that you can never take back.

Revolutionizing the patient experience through crowdsourcing: Use your journey to make a difference

This blog post is sponsored. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

Coping with chronic illness is complicated. When it comes to IBD, no two people have the same experience, but there are often many parallels and overlaps. Crowdsourcing is now being used to understand how to best treat chronic conditions, such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. By empowering patients from all around the world to share information on a large scale and leveraging the power of advanced artificial intelligence to analyze and organize that data, StuffThatWorks is revolutionizing how medical research is done.

Chances are you’ve heard of the popular app, Waze, which allows people to build maps and share data with other drivers to bypass traffic. It’s an app my husband and I use all the time! One of the members of the Waze founding team, Yael Elish, started thinking about how crowdsourcing could be used to understand how to best treat chronic conditions. Yael’s daughter started to struggle with a chronic health condition and wasn’t responding well to treatment. Her illness was taking a heavy toll on the entire family. Yael Elish and daughters_1

“It seems like almost everyone dealing with an ongoing medical condition dedicates endless hours researching, speaking with others, and scanning groups in search of something that can help us feel, and live better. We want to know if there are treatments that will work better, if our side effects are unusual, or if diet or lifestyle changes could make a difference. We look for people like ourselves and seek to learn what works (and doesn’t) for them,” said Elish, Founder, CEO, StuffThatWorks.

When it comes to managing chronic illness, it’s much like trying to find the needle in the haystack—the one treatment that will work best for us. The power lies with patients. We are the people who have tried various treatments and know what’s worked best. Crowdsourcing puts patients in the driver seat. Large amounts of information can be gathered from millions of people worldwide.

“I want people to feel empowered – and validated. To realize that their point of view and experience is not only legitimate but is extremely valuable to helping the world understand illness and treatment effectiveness,” said Elish. “I want StuffThatWorks to be a place where patients can share their collective voice and be heard by the medical community.  Where patients themselves are able to impact and drive the research that is being done about their condition and play an active role in finding solutions that will help everyone with their condition feel better.”

StuffThatWorks Currently Serves 85 Condition Communities

As of now, more than 125,000 people are contributing members within 85 condition communities. Over 6.5 million points of data have been shared! One of the biggest communities (fibromyalgia) has over 15,000 members. PCOS has 12,000.

StuffThatWorks is looking to grow the IBD community.

Right now, there are three communities, IBD in general, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn’s. Of these three, Crohn’s is the biggest with 729 members who have reported their experience with 270 treatments. The ulcerative colitis community has 409 members and 155 treatments in the database.

SymptomsUlcerativeColitis

Take the UC survey: https://stuff.co/s/5sSltbnK

On average, Crohn’s community members report they have tried 6.2 different treatments, and 37% describe their Crohn’s as “severe.” By sharing treatment experiences, our community members can use data to help one another figure out which treatments are best for different subgroups of people.

“The power of this database is that it can reduce the years of searching for the right treatment or combination of treatments. Our platform lets people explore how different treatments work effectively together, and we’re able to analyze everything from surgery and medications to alternative treatments, changes in diet, stress reduction and more,” said Elish.

COVID-19 response

StuffThatWorks is in a unique and powerful place to help advance the research on COVID and understand how it impacts people with different chronic conditions. Who is more at risk? Does the virus present differently in people with certain conditions? Do certain treatments work better/worse for them?

“We are currently prioritizing COVID-19 research by inviting everyone with a chronic condition to contribute to the research by answering questions about their experiences related to the coronavirus pandemic, even if they do not have the virus. We are also inviting all current StuffThatWorks members to fill out the coronavirus questionnaire and contribute to this new research,” said Elish. “We’ve also set up a dedicated coronavirus discussion forum, where doctors are answering questions and providing important information about the latest research.”

In a time when many people are feeling anxious and alone—discussion boards are helping to bridge the communication gap and allow for people to connect with one another. StuffThatWorks community members are seeking support about decisions: Should I cancel my doctor’s appointment? How much am I at risk if I am taking immunosuppressants? How can I help my partner understand my anxiety about coronavirus?

The world is suddenly realizing that crowdsourcing is the holy grail of how to gather health care data on a large scale. The real-time nature of it is particularly important, and the ability to get data from such a vast number of diverse sources.

Crowdsourcing research is limitless: The hope for the IBD community

You’ve heard the adage “strength in numbers”. Once large numbers of people with IBD sign up and become members on this free platform, everyone from the newly diagnosed to veteran patients can find something new and continue to evolve and learn about their patient journey.

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Take the Crohn’s survey: https://stuff.co/s/bzqQR5xP

“I want people with IBD to feel empowered – that this community is THEIRS, not OURS – and that they can determine what it’s used for and how it can be most helpful. They can add new research questions, post personal discussions or experiences and ask others specifically what works and doesn’t for them,” said Elish.

As members of the IBD family, by joining this platform we immediately become part of a supportive community where we can talk with others just like us, either collectively, or one on one, about how we manage and handle the day-to-day with our IBD.

Driving Research through Patient Reported Outcomes

Patients like you and me have power to influence the research direction of the medical world. We are all a piece of the puzzle and play a critical role in helping with the future development of medications and treatments, and hopefully one day a cure.

So much medical research is done using small groups and funding for large-scale research is extremely hard to come by. The opportunities are endless with crowdsourcing, in terms of the research that can be collected and the solutions we as patients can only provide. LightsCameraCrohns-Blogpost_image

Whether it’s shortening the amount of time it takes to get an IBD diagnosis or helping people find optimal treatments quicker, by sharing our experiences we gain invaluable insight into improving our quality of life and managing our chronic illness. It’s truly a win-win for everyone involved.

Check out StuffThatWorks and sign up for free as a member. Take part in building a knowledge base aimed at figuring out which treatments work best. Your story. Your experience. It’s powerful and it all matters.

Telehealth: Where Have you Been All My Life? Making the Most Out of Your Next Appointment

They say there’s a first for everything and that was the case for me with telehealth visits. Nearly 15 years into my patient journey with Crohn’s disease, and I had never had a video chat with a physician. Going into the experience felt a bit daunting, a little uncomfortable. As patients, we get so used to our routine for managing our illness, that changing the course of care can make us feel anxious. I know I’m in the majority when it comes to being new to this whole telemedicine thing. Let me tell you, I really loved it. I walked away from my computer smiling and feeling happy. Here’s why.

Connecting over video saved me time and a whole lotta energy

My commute to and from my GI office is about 35 minutes and usually involves bringing at least one of my kids with me or coordinating childcare. It was awesome to just walk into my kitchen and instantly connect with my physician. We’ve talked on the phone many times in the past when I have a question or an issue but conversing over video made a big difference. You feel much more connected and like you’re sitting in the same room.

I didn’t feel rushed

Oftentimes while in the examining room, I feel like I’m racing the clock to get all my questions asked. It can feel like I’m just one of many appointments in a row and that my physician is bouncing from room to room. There was a sense of calm and a laid-back aspect of the call that sat well with me. It felt like a 35-minute heart-to-heart that was genuine, educational, and comforting. I felt listened to and heard. We talked about everything from my Crohn’s symptoms to my next colonoscopy, and how to handle everything with the COVID-19 pandemic.

We set a game plan in place

Something I love about my GI is that she’s extremely proactive and aggressive. You ask her a question and she immediately has a confident response. I’ve been more symptomatic the past few weeks than I have been for awhile, so she ordered a fecal calprotectin test to see if there was any inflammation going on. My husband, Bobby, picked up the test from the lab and I will bring the completed test in when I get my bloodwork this week. As far as my annual colonoscopy for later this summer, she told me that we should be ok to get the scope in, as that’s an ideal window for when things are expected to calm down COVID-wise. If we waited or delayed the scope, she fears it could be a YEAR until we’re able to do one again. Telehealth-interpreters-tel-1140x500

She determined that part of the reason I may be experiencing more abdominal pain is unintentionally changing up my diet. Something so many of us are doing right now. Our family hasn’t had take-out food since March 12th. While it’s great to have a healthier diet, having less processed foods can make things more challenging on our digestive systems. She recommended I incorporate more carbs into my daily diet, drink more water from a cup vs. a straw or a bottle (as that can cause gas to build up), and even try drinking peppermint tea or having peppermint oil in the air.

Guidance for navigating the pandemic and IBD

I asked my GI about her recommendations for what to do once Stay at Home orders are lifted and how long social distancing should be in place as someone who is immunocompromised from my medication. She said I am free to go to public parks and trails (while wearing a mask) but should stay out of everything from supermarkets to shopping malls through the summer. She advised it would be best to have my husband continue to run our necessary errands while wearing a mask. She’s anticipating a second peak of the virus will happen when the colder weather approaches.

Luckily, Bobby has been able to work from home since March 18th, a benefit of corporate America. When I asked about what to do when he has to go back in the office, she said he would need to wear a mask and at the sign of any symptoms, would need to stay away from our family.

As far as flaring and needing to go to the hospital, my GI recommended keeping her in the loop and openly communicating about symptoms so we can handle as much as we can outpatient. If there is an acute issue (fever, vomiting, etc.—things that happen with an obstruction), then I should go to the hospital as I normally would.

When it comes to IBD patients being tested with an antibody test, she doesn’t foresee that happening unless we are about to go into surgery or have a procedure. Even then, she says our immune response is different than that of the rest of the population.

Recommendations to keep in mind ahead of your telehealth appointments

Come prepared. Have questions. Be open about your symptoms and don’t downplay anything. Your physician can only help you if they know what’s going on.

Familiarize yourself with the technology. I choose to do my call on the computer, much like a Zoom meeting, but through the patient program provided by my office. There was also an option to click a link in a text message and chat like you’re on FaceTime. telemed

Try to have a quiet space for your call where you can focus. Unfortunately, my husband had a work call during my appointment, but I was able to put the baby down for a nap and bribe my 3-year-old with some snacks and TV. He only interrupted a couple of times, but my physician understood and we had a good laugh about how fruit snacks work wonders to calm or distract toddlers.

Ask about billing. Telehealth appointments at my doctor’s office are billed the same as a routine appointment. Make sure your office has your insurance information ahead of time.

Listen to this About IBD podcast from one of my favorite patient advocates, Amber Tresca, and one of the top IBD docs, Dr. Nandi, about how to best prepare for telehealth appointments during the pandemic.

 

Growing through the grief of COVID-19: Love, A mom with daughters recently diagnosed with Crohn’s

Life was much different for Michelle Manasseh and her family of Orange County, California, one year ago. For starters, her daughters had not been diagnosed with IBD and we weren’t living in the middle of a global pandemic. This week, Michelle shares what it’s like being a parent of two kids newly diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease, while trying to navigate everything that is COVID-19.

It hasn’t even been nine months since Eve (age 11) and Ruthie (age 9), BOTH of our kids, were diagnosed with Crohn’s, and BOOM—COVID-19 happens! So yeah, let’s pile pandemic on top of chronic illness, on top of school being cancelled indefinitely, on top of no contact with any. other. human. soul. for. weeks. on. end. What do we call this? Grief. 5EEF5B29-5EB9-407F-9154-F708F04B5F38

There’s no other name for it. Our whole culture is grieving. One important lesson that the kids’ diagnosis has taught me is how to grieve. And I mean how to really grieve. Parents of kids with IBD know a thing or two about grief. We went through it when our kid was diagnosed, when the next kid was diagnosed, when the flare hit, when the medication changed, when the game plan failed. It comes in waves and it comes out of nowhere.

Our culture has taught us to numb and distract – don’t do it! Don’t miss the chance to be refined by the pandemic fire. Yeah, it’s uncomfortable, but we need to let ourselves feel emotions so we can come through this with true peace and wisdom. If we avoid the fire or pretend it isn’t there, we are doing ourselves – and our kids – a disservice. We need to teach them that grieving is normal and ok. It’s ok to cry. It’s ok to be angry. It’s ok to be sad. We need to remind them that we are all feeling the same things and we will get through it together.

We can’t fix this

Something I realized pretty quickly after my girls were diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease is that I couldn’t fix it. There wasn’t a single special diet, mix of herbs, supplements, exercise, tincture, oil, weed, seed, handstand, or flip that could fix it. And this was a painful truth to learn. As a parent, our natural instinct is to fix things for our kids. We’re stocked with band aids, kisses, and unsolicited advice.

Crohn’s is beyond my control. This has been very humbling for me. Likewise, COVID-19 is humbling our culture. I think it’s revealing a huge blind spot. With the rise of self-proclaimed health experts and medical misinformation circulating broadly across our connected culture, people have believed that they can fix all their own medical problems. Now that blindness is obvious. Just as IBD is not a stomach ache, COVID-19 is not a common cold. We can’t fix it. People are feeling helpless and turning to doctors in desperation. I hope a silver lining is that it invigorates the medical profession and brings to our culture a profound respect for doctors, nurses, and all healthcare workers.

Uncertainty illuminates

For the first time in several decades, the whole world is living under a bleak cloud of uncertainty because of COVID-19. A similar dark cloud rolled over our home last summer when Eve and Ruthie were diagnosed with Crohn’s. I learned that with great uncertainty comes deep discomfort. It forces us down tunnels of self-examination, to take stock of our lives and our purpose. It illuminates our utter dependence on God.

Crisis also has a way of illuminating our deep-seated motivations. Who are we seeing on TV and across social media lately? People with the purest motivations. Doctors. Actors reading sonnets and bedtime stories. Public officials creating guidelines to protect us. Musicians playing across balconies. This is a great teaching moment for our kids. Become a financial advisor to help people. Be a writer to reveal truth. An artist to bring joy. A doctor to bring healing. A musician to bring beauty. An actor to tell stories that need to be told.

What can we do?

Parents – we are navigating a global pandemic with immunosuppressed kids with chronic illness. Let’s be honest, we have massive fears. I had to bring Eve in for an MRI two weeks ago. In my mind, the machine was basically a plastic tube crawling with yellow spindly germs. Never mind a mask – why didn’t someone plastic wrap my child?!? IMG_8604

We are dealing with a heck of a lot, and none of us is perfect. I’m quite certain that my kids will never again ask to be home schooled. The main skill we’ve mastered so far is how to do a Zoom conference while driving to infusions! On Friday night I sipped wine while the girls smeared Nutella on crackers after eating only half of their dinner. Two days later I inadvertently put Eve’s daily Miralax in Ruthie’s water bottle. (Oh gosh, is she flaring!?!) I, for one, would relish a shirt that says “WORK IN PROGRESS” printed in bold neon letters.

No, we aren’t perfect, but we do have something to give. We have a unique perspective and experience. We can be a voice. More importantly, we can be an ear—for our kids and for others. Call a friend and listen. Tell people the good things you’re thinking about them. Tell them you love them. And very importantly, take the time to thank your kids’ teachers, doctors, and nurses for all they have done and continue to do—they are real life heroes.

 

Seeing the beauty through the struggle: IBD mom welcomes third child amidst COVID-19 pandemic

Welcoming a baby into the world brings so many emotions to the surface. For IBD mom, Suzy Burnett, of Madison, Wisconsin, it’s been a rollercoaster. She had her third baby, Guy Richard, February 29th. IMG_0146Right before COVID-19 started wreaking havoc in the States. Before Guy was born, Suzy’s biggest fear was a postpartum flare. After the birth of her second oldest daughter, Alice, she had the worst Crohn’s flare of her life and was hospitalized.

Now, as her and her family face the COVID-19 pandemic, she has a new set of concerns. Will Guy be able to stay healthy until his immune system matures a bit? How will her daughters adjust to the new addition? Will she be able to stay well despite being immunocompromised? COVID-19 added a whole new slew of uphill battles that she or anyone else for that matter hasn’t been prepared to deal with. This week Suzy shares her perspective as an IBD mom, doing all she can to protect herself and her family in the face of this viral war.

As anyone who has ever had a baby, you know those first two weeks, involve several doctor appointments. Guy still had high bilirubin levels when we brought him home, so this meant we needed to make extra trips to his pediatrician. Sounds easy, right? There was so much involved this time around. Babies don’t have that immunity built up yet, so we had to use a special entrance, and go straight to our room to avoid any contact with the public. I couldn’t help but glance at the waiting room and see all the long faces adorned with facial masks. It was swimming with sick kiddos. I felt incredibly lucky at that moment as we escaped the chesty coughs, and furniture that had been saturated in illness.IMG_0147

One week went by, and things quickly changed to Zoom and FaceTime appointments. Not only did the baby’s appointments change…but mine did as well. Those of us with Crohn’s disease can’t always get by with a virtual chat about our symptoms. But here we are.

Navigating health issues brought on by my IBD

Many people with IBD develop extra-intestinal manifestations. IMG_0144Unfortunately, when I was put on prednisone last summer, I developed extremely high eye pressures. I was diagnosed as “Glaucoma suspect” at 40 years old, meaning I have some risk of the disease, but no proven damage (yet), so my eyes are monitored often.

I’m also dealing with an external hemorrhoid, thanks to excessive diarrhea, along with an anal fissure, all while caring for three children—one being a newborn.

For those of you who don’t know, an anal fissure is a small tear in the thin, moist tissue (mucosa) that lines the anus. I’m treating the fissure with topical lidocaine and a suppository three times per day. I’ve had my fair share of pain, but this ranks right up there with my non-sedated sigmoidoscopy and childbirth. It feels like broken glass, or razor blades back there. There’s a chance this has progressed to a fistula, and I may require surgery in the weeks to come.

Normally, I would be seen right away, but due to the current COVID-19 crisis, it’s been several phone calls back and forth with the nurses triaging my symptoms. I’m confident the hemorrhoid will go away, but if the fissure doesn’t, I might be facing surgery, and right now a trip to the hospital could be life threatening.

Seeing the beauty through the struggle

Amidst this horrific event that is crippling our world, there is an unexpected beauty that has surfaced. Our wonderful party of five has become closer than close. Yes, there are times when we all go a bit loony, but we’re embracing this time together. My kids are my world, my everything. I need to be the best version of myself, and a huge part of that now and forever is not letting my IBD win. Even when my disease has a strong hold on me, I never let my kids see the struggle.

If you’re reading this and you’re unsure about whether you’ll be able to handle your IBD and motherhood, I’m here to tell you it’s possible. IMG_0148As a woman and a mom of three who has battled Crohn’s since 2008, I believe if it’s your dream to have children, or a family, you should most definitely pursue that. Consult with your GI and OB doctors prior to getting pregnant, and make sure you’re in remission. Pregnancy can be challenging, but if you’re also flaring, it’s that much harder.

As we all experience the change in our day-to-day lives during the COVID-19 pandemic, whether you have IBD or not, there has been a return to simplicity. A back to basics mentality that is exponentially refreshing. Take a walk outside and breathe in and out. Right now, we’re forced to take our time, dig deep, and focus on our inner beings. Much like the experience of dealing with the diagnosis of IBD, it’s a time to peel back those layers and re-discover YOU.

Follow Suzy’s journey by checking out her blog: Crohnie Mommy