Why you shouldn’t put ‘self-heal’ and Crohn’s in the same sentence

This article was written earlier this month, while getting my hair done. 

I hear her cry. I glance at the clock that reads 4:55 a.m. I clutch my abdomen. The pain I went to bed with hours earlier is amplified. IMG_4409It feels like a fiery pain inside my rib cage that travels all the way down my stomach. The gnawing makes me feel raw internally and externally. I put my glasses on and as I’m standing up and rocking my daughter in her nursery, I try to think of her warm little body as a heating pad.

I wrestle with my thoughts about how to handle my pain. Last time I took pain medication I couldn’t breastfeed my daughter for 20 hours. I decide to take one 600 mg ibuprofen left over from my C-section recovery, with the understanding that as someone with IBD I shouldn’t be taking that. But I’m desperate. Desperate to get a reprieve from the pain and the inner monologue racing in my head as I lay back down. While at the same time, trying to keep my painful moans quiet so I don’t wake my husband.

I wake up and the pain is still there, but I have no choice but to take on the day. Thanks to my mom being in town, I’m able to head to the hair salon for a much needed hair cut and color. The stylist asks me questions and my Crohn’s comes up fairly quickly in the conversation. Her response—“one of my best friends has Crohn’s and she’s completely self-healed herself by eating very strictly”. She goes on to say her godmother has Crohn’s, too—and constantly posts pics on social media eating and drinking, so it’s no wonder she struggles, acting almost disgusted by her godmother’s lifestyle and patient journey.

I bite my tongue. The pain from the night before and the worries weighing heavily on my mind and heart are still fresh. Self-healing and Crohn’s, if only it were that easy, that simplistic. But I don’t have the energy to get into that discussion. IMG-3099The fact that so many people without IBD are under the assumption that our pain and symptoms are self- imposed upsets me. We already beat ourselves up mentally as it is. My husband and I took our son for ice cream last night, so immediately I wonder if all of my pain is a result of the choice to have ice cream with my 2-year-old.

As a mom who’s battled Crohn’s for nearly 14 years, the background noise and ignorant comments about IBD tend to bounce off me. I have thick skin, now. But, it’s worrisome at the same time. What if the girl getting her hair done wasn’t me? What if she was newly diagnosed and struggling? What if she chose to go off all medications and “self-heal” because someone cutting her hair told her it was possible? This is what we’re up against as patients. Everyone tries to relate and thinks they are offering “words of wisdom” or assurance, when really they’re just contributing to the hurt and feelings of being less than. IMG-4410

Luckily, I’m not that girl. But—if you’re reading this, know that your patient journey is unique to you. What works for one person, will not necessarily work for you. Needing medication to manage symptoms and keep your disease from progressing is not a sign of laziness or weakness. You need to take the steps necessary to improve your quality of life and overall health. Living with IBD is not black and white. There is so much gray area. Trust in your physician. Trust in the support available both online and in your community from fellow patients. Be patient in discovering what works for you, be flexible, and do what you need to do to self-heal.

Why my husband is much more than a caregiver, Dr. Phil

I still remember the moment I told my husband I had Crohn’s disease. It was a beautiful August afternoon. We sat overlooking water at a boathouse in St. Louis on our third date. As we enjoyed casual conversation and a mutual interest in one another, I knew I had to tell him about my chronic illness.

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Photo from our third date, the day I told Bobby I had Crohn’s disease.

Nervous to rock the boat. Scared to be judged. Worried it would tarnish the image of who I was so far. I just wanted to rip off the band aid and get this conversation over with.

It was never easy to navigate dating and relationships with my disease. I was diagnosed with Crohn’s at age 21 in 2005. I met Bobby in August 2013 at age 29. Rather than seem put off by my disease, he inquired and showed empathy from that point forward. Never once did he make me feel less than or unworthy of love. In that moment, I knew I had found someone special and I felt a huge sense of relief.

Fast forward to this past month and all the conversation surrounding Dr. Phil’s heartless and ignorant comments about caregiving and relationships. I didn’t see the episode live, but have seen the countless posts on social media being shared to prove him wrong. I watched the interview clip after the segment aired and couldn’t believe my eyes or my ears. Dr. Phil told an interabled couple that “100 out of 100 relationships that involve caregiving fail.”

Photo by J Elizabeth Photography www.jelizabethphotos.com

Helping me walk down stairs during our engagement photos–21 days post op from my bowel resection surgery. Photo cred: J. Elizabeth Photography

It pains me to even write the idiotic words that man said. Not only is it upsetting, but it breaks my heart to think of all the young, newly diagnosed chronic illness patients out there who were already wondering if they were worthy of love because of living with a disease.

IMG_0077I’m here to tell you that you are. I truly believe my vulnerability with my Crohn’s and how I deal with flare ups is a big part of why my husband fell in love with me. Chronic illness isn’t pretty. It forces you to see the world without rose-colored glasses. It makes you realize the importance of your health and how quickly it can be taken away from you.

There’s a reason why you say “in sickness and in health” in wedding vows. My husband chose to spend his life with me, because he loves all of me—even the part of me that is riddled with illness. People are cut out to be caregivers or they’re not. You’ll come across this in your life and know which family members and friends have a special way about them. Those who don’t have this trait and ability aren’t meant to marry people like you and me. And that’s fine.

But to say that 100 out of 100 couples will fail because caregiving is involved couldn’t be further from the truth. It’s through Bobby’s caregiving that I continue to fall more and more in love with him. It’s those moments when I need help to get through a pain-filled day that I’m reminded just how strong and unbreakable our love is.

IMG_9492Caregiving looks and means different things to everyone. It’s not just about being a caregiver in the hospital or at a nursing home. It’s taking care of the one(s) you love on a typical day at home. It can be something as simple as rubbing your back or taking care of the kids while you’re stuck in the bathroom. It can be dishing you out ice cream after you give yourself an injection. Or holding your hand on a walk outside following a hospitalization. It’s those caregiving moments in particular that remind me constantly of the everlasting love I’ve found and make me 100 percent positive we will make it through, for the rest of my life.

My words of advice for you—if you’re a caregiver, know how appreciated you are—for all the little things and the big things. photo by J Elizabeth Photography www.jelizabethphotos.comIf you’re someone dealing with a disability/disease—don’t allow Dr. Phil’s ridiculously inaccurate comments make you think you aren’t worthy of love, because you are and always will be.

 

 

Ready to Roll: Charmin unveils its new “Forever” Toilet Paper Roll

This post was sponsored by Charmin. Personal opinions and thoughts are my own.

Safe to say we’ve all been there. You’re in the bathroom. You look. No toilet paper. Not a fun predicament to be in, especially when you live with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Talking about bathroom habits is somewhat taboo, regardless of whether you have a health issue. It’s not usually a comfortable conversation to have with others. But, just like the children’s book states, “Everyone Poops” and it’s nothing to be ashamed of. IMG_4815

After living with Crohn’s disease for more than 13 years, I’ve spent countless time dealing with bathroom issues and worrying about accidents. It’s become a part of my life and daily routine. It’s a personal part of my patient journey, but it’s also something that I know I’m not alone in dealing with.

Here’s where the Charmin Forever Roll comes in. It takes away all the hassles of running out of toilet paper. The roll lasts up to ONE MONTH! And yes, boys and girls, it’s available in Charmin Ultra Soft, America’s softest toilet paper made with 2-ply sheets.

When it comes to dealing with flare ups, prepping for colonoscopies and recovering from surgery and hospitalizations, the Forever Roll takes the focus off the toiletries and gives you one less thing to worry about. When your IBD is flaring and fatigue is weighing you down, the “simple” act of making a quick run to the store for toilet paper or even changing the roll can seem strenuous, especially if you live on your own or if you’re building up stamina following abdominal surgery.

At first glance, the Forever Roll may look rather large IMG_4811and industrial to have in your personal bathroom. But reviews far and wide have been overwhelmingly positive!

As a stay at home mom who lives with IBD, oftentimes it’s just my 20-month-old son and I home together during the day. If the roll is out, I’m in quite the predicament. I’ll be adding a baby girl to the mix in a few weeks, so then I’ll really have my hands full! The Forever Roll is efficient and provides peace of mind.

“Charmin is always looking for to ways to improve the lives of consumers, and the Charmin Forever Roll delivers on a big tension: constantly having to change the roll of toilet paper,” said a P&G spokesperson. “By removing one more hassle in the bathroom, consumers can focus on other things without the fear of running out of TP.  Charmin hopes the Forever Roll alleviates this concern and provides a sense of relief for the IBD community with the same quality TP they know and love.”IMG_4837

Click here to order your Charmin Forever Roll Starter Kit. With the Starter Kit you get 3 Forever Rolls, free shipping and a FREE stainless steel roll holder. You have the option for a 1-user bathroom or a multi-user bathroom, so it’s perfect for any household.

Whether you live with IBD or if you’re the picture of health, we all need toilet paper to get through the day. I know I won’t miss opening the door and asking my husband to bring me toilet paper! Give it a go and let me know what you think.

A letter to my 21-year-old, newly diagnosed self: From 13 years in the future

This past week I turned 35. Birthdays for me are always a time of reflection on what was and excitement for what the future holds. Each year is so transformative, especially when it comes to how you handle and deal with chronic illness. natalie35bdayWhen I was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease at age 21, a month before my 22nd birthday—life had so many unknowns. I bottled up a lot of fears about how my life story would unfold and if I would be able to accomplish the hopes and dreams I had thought were a given.

This week, a letter to my 21-year-old, newly diagnosed self—from my current 35-year-old self. With time and experience, comes perspective. Perspective that I wish I had back when my world came crashing down upon me after learning I would forever have a disease for which there is no cure.

For those embarking on this journey—whether you’re the patient or the parent—you may feel like you are drowning in worry of what is to come with your lives. I hope my words will bring you comfort and the knowingness that you have a lot of life to live, and you will do just that.

Dear Natalie (age 21),

I can still see you looking at yourself in the mirror—feeling like a skeleton of who you used to be. Cheeks sunken in, eyes tired, arms covered with bright purple bruises from all the IV sticks, pokes and prods. You’re sitting up in bed, popping big bubbles with your chewing gum, trying to deal with the insomnia and ravenous appetite that comes along with taking 60 mg of prednisone. You’re thinking about how easy and simplistic life was a matter of weeks ago, graduating from college—hoping to land your first television gig as a news reporter.

Everything feels like it’s in shambles. You are perplexed about why you were dealt this hand of cards and why the rug was completely pulled out from under you, when just a matter of months ago you had the world by the tail.

Here’s what I want you to know. Nothing comes before your health. No job, no relationship, no friendship. There are going to be difficult times ahead as you figure out which people in your life genuinely want to be by your side, and which are only around for the fun, healthy times. feb13blogmainphotoIt’s a path that will bring you heartache. Significant others will let you down—you’ll be disheartened when they fail to show up when you need them most…but, then it will happen. You will meet the person who was meant to fight this fight beside you. You’ll know. You’ll see how that person loves you unconditionally and even more so, because of your illness. They will see you as so much more—see yourself the way they see you. Not some sick person. A person who has a sickness that is part of them, but far from all of them.

Professionally—you may need to take a different path that better suits your needs. natalienews2Don’t allow this illness to make you think you aren’t capable—because you are. You will surprise yourself, if you continue to be positive and find alternative ways to make your dreams become your reality. I know you’re sitting there with your huge spreadsheet of 200 U.S. cities, wondering which TV station you’ll be able to work at…and if your journalism career will ever happen. Looking back—I’m so proud of you for continuing that job search amidst your very first flare. Looking for jobs across the country, as you swallowed 22 pills a day, grappled with a chronic illness diagnosis and dealt with all the side effects and pain that is Crohn’s. Work ethic and attitude will take you far with this disease. IMG_4248You will shine under those bright studio lights.

Stop with the timelines and deadlines in your mind. You don’t need to be married and have kids by age 30. I know you think you want that, but trust in God’s plan for you and know that your future will fall into place the way it is meant to. Don’t rush yourself. Don’t feel less than just because all your friends seem to be checking off those boxes. Your time will come.

When you attend doctor appointments and when you are hospitalized be vocal. Be your own best advocate. Don’t be intimidated by the people in white coats. You know your body better than anybody else. It’s ok to cry. It’s ok to be angry. It’s ok to lash out. Have patience with yourself as you navigate your new normal and trust that the temporary hardships and hurt are just that, scary. The first of anything can be scary. FullSizeRenderThat first CT scan, that first colonoscopy, that first surgery, that first injection…it’s a lot to deal with. You’ll shake like a leaf and then as time goes on—you won’t bat an eye. You will find a strength within yourself that you never knew was there. You’ll be a seasoned warrior in no time.

What seems so foreign to you now, will soon be something you understand and can decipher immediately. Those symptoms—the pain, it’s all new now. In the future, you’ll have a good idea of what’s happening. What triggered it. How to help yourself. You won’t be as alarmed. You’ll know exactly what you need to do and when a hospital visit is a must.

I want you to know that everything is going to be alright. It’s going to be more than alright. You will thrive. You’ll beat the odds. You’ll land multiple TV gigs. You’ll fall in love. You’ll meet the one. You’ll be a mommy. IMG_6401You’ll do all these things. All with your sidekick—your enemy, but also your ally, Crohn’s. The one thing that really sets you apart. In the future you won’t keep your disease a secret, rather it will come up in conversations almost immediately, with a sense of confidence. A badge of honor. Yes, I have Crohn’s. Yes, it’s not ideal. But, yes…it’s made me sort of a bad ass. I’ve been through a lot. I haven’t backed down. And there’s so much life left to live.

You are not broken. You are not less than. This disease will take you on a journey you never imagined. Hold on tight, hang in there through all the scares and celebrate all the wonderful feel good days when your quality of life feels untouchable. And smile. Smile on the good days, smile through the bad days. Trust me. You got this. _F6B6137

Love yourself—everything that makes you, you—

Natalie, age 35