5 Ways to Make Money At Home In The COVID-19 Era

The way we work looks a lot differently these days than months prior. Chances are the COVID-19 pandemic has forced you to work from home, put your job on hold, or be out on the frontlines. Whatever the case may be, there are ways to adapt to these challenging times to help make ends meet. This week—a guest post from Annelise Bretthauer, a certified Financial Planner who also has Crohn’s disease. IMG_0834She offers up some invaluable advice about freelancing and educating yourself about opportunities that are right at your fingertips.

The gig economy has opened up opportunities to make money in a variety of new ways but many of these jobs are not conducive to our IBD community nor COVID-19. Although, driving for Uber or making grocery runs for Instacart offers great flexibility with work hours, it doesn’t meet our IBD needs and puts our immunocompromised community at risk. Thinking about what was available yesterday can blind us from what is available today and what might be available tomorrow. With every struggle and every hurdle comes a silver lining. We just need to know where to look.

The world will never truly be the same after COVID-19 and with that will come new opportunities. New opportunities for even more flexible work that is better suited to our IBD community. Opportunities our IBD community is uniquely prepared for.

We already know how to work from home productively. We already know how to manage hard times and keep going. We already know how to overcome daily challenges and find ways to keep our mental state healthy. We’ve been strengthening our creativity and time management muscles for years. We are strong and have developed a comfort with being vulnerable that allows us to show up in non-traditional ways that our peers cannot. To quote Brené Brown, we are masters at “being in the arena.” IMG_2273

We are wildly adaptable and we’ve already learned to find a community online and make deep connections without ever sitting face to face.

All of these things put our IBD community at the top of the talent pool when it comes to the new jobs that will be created (or established jobs that will evolve) through this crisis. Keep your eye out and your ears open. This list of 5 creative and flexible IBD friendly ways to make money at home is just the beginning!

#1: For The Typing Expert:

Write Transcripts for Audio Files

This job is ideal for those who already spends much of their day on the computer and can type quickly without error. You can make $0.25 – $2.50 per audio/video minute, which translates to ~$15-$25 per hour.

Here are a couple places to go to get started:

#2: For The Person Who Is Happy To Invest In More Education To Make A Bit More Money:

Become A Remote Tax Preparer

This job is ideal for someone who is detail oriented and thinks they could get behind making tax preparation fun and engaging. Once you complete the education (there are some costs associated with doing this) and become certified for tax preparation, you could make up to $100 per hour.

Here are a couple places to go to get started:

#3: For The Computer Wiz:

Get paid to test others websites for usability and content.

This job is ideal for those who can’t stand when a website is hard to navigate and has lots of ideas for how they could make it better. There is quite a range in pay per test (~$5-$90) but it iron’s out to an average pay of around ~$20 per hour.

Here are a couple places to go to get started:

#4: For The Person Who Loves Crossing All The T’s & Dotting All The I’s:

Become an Online Remote Notary (available in in 23 states)

This job is ideal for someone who is detail oriented and enjoys the process of making sure everything is done correctly. Although each state differs in what you are legally allowed to charge for notary services, in most states the maximum is $25 per notarization.

Here is where to go to get started:

#5: For The Early Riser or Night Owl Who Prefers Working Odd Hours:

Teach English Online

This job is ideal for someone who likes to be up early or stays up late. That is because many of the jobs are teaching English to foreigners in different time zones. Please note, many sites require a bachelor’s degree and a TEFL teaching certificate. The pay does vary significantly but most sites pay between $10-$26 per hour.

Here are a couple places to go to get started:

  • Magic Ears (need TEFL teaching certification + bachelor’s degree)
  • VIPKid (Platform offers TEFL certification but you will need a bachelor’s degree)
  • ET Teach Online (need TEFL teaching certification + bachelor’s degree)
  • Cambly (no experience needed)

If none of the options above speak to you or you aren’t sure where to start, check out Chronically Capable. Chronically Capable is a job site designed only for those with chronic illness. You can browse for jobs that have already been pre-screened by their team – pretty awesome huh!? IMG_7756

From one IBD warrior to another, don’t ever lose sight of your worth. Your skills and your adaptability will rise to the top of the talent pool. We can’t pour from an empty cup, so remind yourself that self-care is other’s care.

If you’ve ever been curious about how others make, save and spend their money, feel free to check out Annelise’s podcast, This American Wallet. She interviews different people from different walks of life about money. Available for a listen on Apple podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or Google Podcasts.  

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only and is not to be taken as advice of any kind. All pay estimates were made in best efforts given the informational available via each company website.

 

My family calls me “Sergeant COVID”: Navigating life while being high-risk, as the world reopens

I’m preparing to feel like the bad guy in the months ahead. My family has already jokingly called me “Sergeant COVID”.  As an IBD mom who is immunocompromised, the decisions I make as the world starts to reopen may step on some toes. I’ve always been one to struggle with confrontation and take it upon myself to be a people-pleaser, which isn’t always a good thing. But this. This is different. I know there will be times I need to speak up and say no.

While out on a walk with my family in our neighborhood this week, we approached a house with two moms sitting side by side, a play date was going down.

sophiawalk15months

Daily walks and getting fresh air help to keep us sane!

Several kids ran around the yard. An SUV parked next to the two moms with their thermoses. I turned to my husband when I spotted them and said, “well there’s a playdate.” He laughed and said, “Are you not going to allow Reid and Sophia to see anyone for a year?”

Well, that’s a good question my friends. Who knows what these next few months will bring, and as someone who is immunocompromised from my biologic medication, that may need to be the reality if things don’t make a drastic turnaround for the better as far as number of cases and deaths.

I want to be together with my friends and family as much as the next person

I also understand the risk associated with getting together with people who have not taken social distancing and quarantine as strictly as my family has. I haven’t stayed in my house and neighborhood since March 12th and only ventured to the grocery store and for bloodwork once, to throw those efforts out the window. I haven’t cooked every meal for my family and refrained from ordering take out for nothing.

baking

Trying lots of new recipes has been a great distraction.

The moment I let my guard down before I feel comfortable, the moment I put myself or my family at risk.

As someone who’s worried about sickness from germs and flare-ups for years, I see this pandemic through a different lens than many. Anyone in the IBD community who is on immunosuppressive medication has a different perspective. I’m already anxious about having to justify my decisions to stay home as life slowly starts getting back to a new normal for everyone. But until I feel safe, we’ll be taking all the precautions.

I wonder just as much as the next person in the chronic illness community how to navigate these difficult conversations with well-meaning and otherwise “healthy” friends and family. When I hear about people getting together indoors, going for walks with people outside their nuclear family, having people over for BBQs, even being essential workers (which I know can’t be helped)—I know the date I’ll see those friends and family just gets pushed further away.

When things calm down, the first people my kids and I will see indoors, will be my parents, who have practiced strict social distancing and haven’t ventured out for anything but groceries. If they were out and about and seeing others, that wouldn’t be the case.

We all need to do what we feel comfortable with and worry less about hurting someone’s feelings or getting a little backlash for our decisions. Luckily, my husband Bobby has been extremely understanding and supportive and backs me up on how I feel. IMG-1529

The best thing we can do is over-communicate. Talk openly about life as someone who is immunocompromised and what recommendations and parameters around social distancing your care team has shared with you. By talking about what your doctor has told you, it validates your worries and fears.

It’s ok to feel disappointed and frustrated. Not everyone has been or will take social distancing and quarantining as seriously as you do. Focus on what you can control—and that is your actions and that of your families. You are doing all that you can to stay safe, and that’s what matters. I’ve had moments where I was physically shaking and so overwhelmed by emotions throughout these past few weeks—because of the actions of others. You see it on social media—the families getting together with several people for Easter, and birthdays, and Mother’s Day. People taking trips on airplanes. Social distancing block parties where people are all standing super close to one another. It’s truly mind-boggling and hard not be judgmental from my vantage point. If you need to cut down on social media or cut ties temporarily with those who you believe are acting irresponsibility, do what you need to do for your mental health and well-being.

We had originally planned to drop off my mother-in-law’s Mother’s Day gifts on the front porch and stay in our car, but my in-laws set up patio furniture on opposite sides of their large patio and we were able to hang out outside 20+ feet apart to exchange presents. It was nice to finally see one another from afar vs. through a window.

Constantly keep your finger on the pulse of research. There are so many physicians in the IBD community truthfully working around the clock to bring patients like us the latest and newest information about COVID-19 as it relates to Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis. Educate yourself on factual, research-based information. Follow top GI doctors on Twitter. Stay in touch with your care team and don’t hesitate to ask questions. Tune in for Facebook Lives and Twitter Chats from IBD Social Circle, IBD Moms, and many other great groups.

Lean on the patient community. Prior to the pandemic, life with a chronic illness already made us feel a bit like outsiders. IMG-1409Now more than ever, we’re being labeled as the “sickly”, the “disposable”, the “weak”, the list goes on. COVID-19 is not JUST about the elderly and immunocompromised, this is about everyone. As patients we have a unique perspective and understanding about the struggles we face daily and what it’s like to go through this challenging time. Connect with fellow patients online who get your reality, your emotion, and the whirlwind of going up against this invisible bogeyman. To refrain from social media, you can download awesome free apps like Gali Health and IBD Healthline, with helpful articles, community conversations, and chats by patients, for patients.

Your FOMO is nothing new. Chances are throughout your patient journey you’ve had to miss out on plans or cancel last minute. Will it be hard when the whole family or your group of friends are getting together, and you tell them you won’t be joining for the big “post-quarantine” reunion? YES. Of course. At the same time, you’ll probably feel comforted not having to worry if so and so is asymptomatic and waiting on pins and needles for two weeks to see if you’re in the clear.

I look so forward to the day when my family and I can reunite with those we love and miss dearly. I just ask that people have understanding, patience, and empathy for those like myself, who will be very fearful to return to life as we used to know it…if that will ever be. Maybe put on the kid gloves and imagine walking in our shoes before you say something that you can never take back.

IBD mom offers up 5 tips for productively working from home

Twenty years ago, Katy Love, was diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease. She was a sophomore in college. She could barely make it out of bed some days, due to the enormous amount of pain and overwhelming fatigue. After her diagnosis and subsequent surgeries, she wondered if she’d ever be able to have a “real job” – like many of us in the chronic illness community, she worried about how she would be able to work and manage her illness. Katy didn’t allow her diagnosis to prevent her from following her personal or professional dreams. Now as an IBD mom, running her own PR business from home, in the middle of a pandemic, she has some advice to share about being successful in the face of adversity. Boulder_Headshots_043

After graduating from college, I took a job at an interactive advertising agency. My dream job. Then, reality set in. I needed to ask for accommodations for my Crohn’s disease– I had to ask for a flexible schedule – one where I could work from home when needed.

I was elated when the agency agreed. Since then, I’ve been blessed to work with several teams (for other companies) that understood my illness and trusted me to work remotely when needed. As someone who has worked from home quite often during my career, due to a chronic illness, I’ve learned a few helpful best practices that have helped save me time… and my sanity.

Create a realistic routine and office hours. If you know you can’t start working until 9 a.m., due to family obligations, don’t start your work time until 9 a.m. Then, plan accordingly for your end time each day. Be sure to share your office hours with your family and colleagues. It’s important for everyone to know when you’re working. Also be patient with your new schedule. As with all new things, it will take some time to become a true routine. This is all new territory – working from home is a normal occurrence for me, however, having all my children and my spouse at home, while trying to work from home, is a new challenge.

Get Dressed. Every single day. I know this may sound silly, as you haven’t left the house in weeks. But I find this extremely important. It sets the tone for the day. When you look the part, you’re much more likely to feel the part. Plus, with all the Zoom calls, you want to look like you aren’t wearing yesterday’s PJs for the weekly team meeting.

Establish a defined workspace. You need an area where you know – this is my desk, my work zone. Your family members know that when you are there, you are working. Working from bed sounds delightful…I love my bed. However, it’s easy to be distracted if you’re not in a specific workspace. IMG_0846Also, surround your workspace with all that you may need during the day. Computer, chargers, phone, etc. I like to also put candles or fresh flowers near my workspace – they smell great and elevate my mood. With spring finally here, go outside and pick a few flowers and put them in a mason jar. Anything that makes you smile and motivates you.

Communication is KEY. I learned this early on in my career. Just because you’re not in physical sight of your team, and your employer, you want them to know you’re ON and working. The worst thing you can do is go dark. If they don’t see you, hear from you, it’s easy to assume you aren’t taking working from home seriously. So, over-communicate with your team during this time.

Take breaks throughout the day. When you’re setting up your new routine/office hours, schedule breaks into the day. Personally, I like to work out in the mornings. So, finding 30 minutes to hop on my bike sets my day up for success. In the afternoon, take a walk outside, or bake with your kids. Katy_Vince_Family_138It’s extremely important to incorporate self-care into your routine right now. There’s so much uncertainty and doom/gloom in the news. Make sure you are taking time to appreciate yourself, your team, and your family, while keeping your health as a top a priority.