When Crohn’s Tries to Stop you from Being Super Dad: How One IBD Dad Finds Balance

The IBD community is flooded with countless female advocates. I’ve recently been vocal about the need for more men to stand up, share their stories, and be a voice for the community. If you attend a conference or an IBD patient advocate event, 90 percent of the room is female, the same can be said for social media.

This is surprising since according to the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation, IBD affects men and women equally. That being said, in my experience speaking with men young and old with Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis—many tend to suffer in silence, downplay their pain, or prefer to keep to themselves about their struggles. While the disease may physically manifest itself and impact men in different ways, it’s the way many feel embarrassed to share their experience, that I wish could change. Colby and Hallie 1

This week—a guest post from Colby Reade. Colby is a husband and a dad who also has Crohn’s disease. He shares insight about his struggles to find a balance between IBD and family life, while offering helpful advice for how to be a “Super Dad” despite your illness. I’ll let him take it away…

I grew up believing my dad was a superhero. There was nothing he didn’t know or couldn’t fix. He would spend hours with my brother and me teaching us how to hit a curve ball or box out a defender on the basketball court. He worked insanely hard to help provide us with a comfortable life. He showed us what it meant to be a partner in a marriage. In my eyes, he was “Super Dad.”

For as long as I can recall, I wanted to live up to that image and a little over four years ago, I got my opportunity when my wife gave birth to our daughter. Nothing is more important to me than being a solid dad and husband. Fatherhood is undoubtedly the most rewarding experience of my life, but also the hardest thing I’ve ever chosen to tackle largely because it is so important to me to be good at it. Ethels Birthday

Unfortunately, life through us a curveball in 2017. What I thought was a case of nervous stomach from a stressful stretch at work turned out to be a Crohn’s flare that lasted 10 months. Not only was I terrified about all the symptoms (digestion issues, pain, fatigue, weight loss), but I felt myself struggling to take on the most important “job” I had.

I was too tired to play or engage when I came home from work…flopping on the ottoman in our living room, trying to pry my eyes open.

I was in pain all the time and struggled to find joy in daddy-daughter games.

I was terrified to be more than five feet from a bathroom so outings to the mall, the zoo or the beach were on hold.

OrchidIt took time and some trial and error, but as I navigate my somewhat new diagnosis, my wife and I have learned how to best monitor my symptoms to try and avoid future flares and take Crohn’s on as a family. In addition to my medical care, this includes some key strategies to how we approach parenting.

Here’s 5 ways we tackle parenting with Crohn’s:

  • Explain to your kiddo what’s going on. This has to be done age-appropriately of course, but it’s important that you don’t hide from your children that you are sick. It is not a failure to admit that you have an illness. Communicate to them that you are under the weather and need their help to adjust your usual routine until you feel better. My kiddo LOVES playing nurse and taking care of her mom or me when we are sick so we can make it into a game.
  • Create activities that don’t involve a lot of energy. While the digestive problems were hard, the fatigue was the worst for me. We started a list of low-energy activities I can do if I find myself mid-flare, such as board games, playing with my daughter’s doll house, and working on crafts.
  • Communicate with your significant other and boss. ThanksgivingMy wife is amazing and understands the physical impacts of a flare, but it’s my job to share with her if I’m feeling Crohn’s-y. Similarly, I have started a dialogue with my boss, so if I flare, I don’t have to pour every ounce of limited energy I have into work and come home completely empty.
  • Find an online community. It can be tempting when you are sick to start Googling your symptoms. This can be a big mistake with IBD because everyone’s case is different and the treatment plan for one person will be greatly different from another’s. However, engaging with an online community either on Twitter, through a Facebook group or an online forum, can be a great resource to gather measured feedback and share your experience.
  • Be kind to yourself. As modern, involved dads we put ourselves under tremendous pressure to be both provider and nurturer. When our bodies are compromised, it can feel like we are failing, weak, and less than. Whether you talk with a counselor, join a support group, or meditate… or all of the above, it’s important to find ways to remind yourself that just because your body is taking on IBD, you are still Super Dad.

You can connect with Colby on Twitter and Instagram (@colbyreade).

 

“My mom has Crohn’s and I do, too”: Why Sam doesn’t allow IBD to take over her life

Motherhood provides perspective. Motherhood shapes us in a way we didn’t know possible. When you’re a mom with IBD, your past and current struggles make you look onward to the future in a different way. Meet Sam Zachrich. _ADP6012She’s a 30-year-old mom and wife from Utah, who works full-time outside the home. She’s battled Crohn’s disease since December 2011.  

Even though she was officially diagnosed a week before her wedding (imagine that!), Crohn’s is something that was a part of her life long before that. Her mom, also has the disease. This week–Sam shares her experience taking on motherhood and marriage, while juggling everything that comes along with a life of chronic illness.

Like someone with a bad knee before a rainstorm. I knew I was not feeling well and the results of my colonoscopy would reflect that. More medication and more doctors is all I heard from my GI. My husband Nate will tell you a different story. He is always my biggest supporter and remembers way more than I do after waking up from a scope. He heard “Sam things look better… your colon is healing… but there are some issues.” All I heard was “issues”. As a Crohnie, it’s easy to focus on the negative of our disease. It’s easy to forget to celebrate how far we’ve come and the milestones we’ve accomplished throughout our journey.

Growing up with a parent who has IBD

I knew my mom had Crohn’s from an early age, but I didn’t fully understand how much pain and hardship it caused her, until I was in college. I had a wonderful childhood, filled with amazing memories. I don’t remember my mom being sick very often. There were hospital visits here and there, I just always had faith that she would get better.

48397243_10213280363469781_8737081387036704768_oMy mom did an amazing job making sure our lives did not revolve around her disease. She did her best to stay healthy and support us. I want my daughter to have the same experience as I had growing up. I don’t want her to ever feel the burden of my disease. I want her to know that no matter how difficult life gets, there is always hope. My mom is the one person I can call who fully understands my struggles. To have another family member that has and is dealing with the same chronic health issues is a huge support. I am very grateful for her.

A mother’s love

My mom was with me for every scope and doctors appointment leading up to my diagnosis of Crohn’s. She was a shoulder to cry on and a listening ear because she completely understood. Feeling guilty is not something we do easily in our family. We try to stay the course and figure out next steps. I think to some degree she had guilt, but she wanted me to stay strong and knew I would be alright. She has always told me to focus on what I can change in the moment.

To this day, she reminds me: Crohn’s will always be apart of your life, it’s what you do with it that matters. 405889_2533476622399_548286302_n

I try not to focus on passing this disease to a third generation. I know that one day I might be in the doctor’s office with my daughter listening to the same talk I received December 2011. Hopefully we will never have to go there, but if we do, I know that the support and perspective that I’ll be able to provide my daughter can make or break a diagnosis.

In sickness and in health, literally

My husband, Nate, was there from the start of my Crohn’s journey. samI remember explaining to him at one point that this disease would be something I will deal with my whole life and it was okay for him to leave me. It’s really hard to put my relationship with my husband into words. When it comes to Crohn’s, the thought of all he does to support me, makes me tear up. He knew that after our wedding day he would take my mom’s place at all my appointments and be my sole caregiver. Nate never shied away from the challenge and it makes me love him more and more everyday. He is my number one and having support from him means the world to me.

Despite receiving the IBD diagnosis a week before getting married, our wedding day was amazing! I look back and don’t remember being sick (thanks to the steroids!). Throughout our lives there will be days we get to be “normal” and we try to embrace those times as a couple and as a family. Don’t allow for this disease to control all aspects of your life. Have that amazing wedding and find a spouse who loves you regardless of your illness. You deserve that and so much more!

Finding peace through support and letting go

Fast forward to this month. Following my scope, I had surgery to remove an abscess. My husband and I had planned a date night for that evening and already had a sitter. We traded our dinner and play tickets in for a night out at the hospital. This was my second surgery to remove an abscess. It doesn’t get any easier, but I have a different mindset now that I am a mom.  _ADP6466

It’s always hard to leave our daughter Kamryn. We are very blessed to have an amazing support system that we can rely on. It’s so helpful to know that when you are going through a medical procedure, the person taking care of your child loves them as much as you do.  We do not have any biological family in Utah. However, we have an amazing church family that really loves and takes care of us just as well.

My advice to fellow IBD parents is to find peace in knowing that your child will understand one day how much sacrifice you have made to fight this disease. There will come a day when they will ask you questions and you can share your experiences with them.  

I am healing well and my doctors are monitoring things to make sure my Crohn’s stays under control. I have had routine blood work since the surgery and it looks like I will be going in for an MRI this week to check on my liver. While these unexpected twists and turns in my patient journey don’t get easier, I’ve learned not to focus on what I can’t control.

The bright spot of my journey

I was blessed to be able to have a baby girl in January. After so many years of hating my body and being sick, my body finally showed me what it’s capable of. I know that my journey with Crohn’s has made me the best mom possible for my sweet Kamryn. Even though my body may be riddled with illness, it was still able to create a perfect miracle. sAM

I have learned to deal with life in a completely unorthodox way, because of my disease. I am a better mom, wife, daughter, sister, coworker, employee, and friend. Don’t get me wrong, there are days I wonder ‘God, why me, why this disease?’ But I know deep down I am stronger for it and He will see me through the tough times and setbacks. As someone who grew up with an IBD mom, it’s my hope Kamryn will someday look at me the same way I look at my mom.

 

Dealing with Depression While Taking on IBD: Louise’s Story

No one feels their best when they are unwell, and this is no different for those with chronic illness. There is an ebb and flow to anything chronic – meaning there are good and bad days – but what happens when your bad days outweigh your good days?

In a Twitter poll I conducted this week asking fellow patients how IBD has impacted their mental health, 40% said they’ve experienced depression and it’s a struggle, while 60% said they’ve dealt with mental health issues from time to time. I found it telling that no one who responded to the poll said their mental health wasn’t impacted at all.

IMG_1807This week a guest post from 31-year-old Louise Helen Hunt from the United Kingdom. She was diagnosed with Crohn’s in 2011 and has undergone four surgeries in the last three years. Louise opens up about her struggles with mental health, while living with IBD and offers incredible perspective and words of wisdom that everyone in our community should be mindful of. I’ll let her take it away…

I hit rock bottom six months into my IBD diagnosis. I struggled to find a treatment plan that worked. This involved months of being in and out of hospital. I tried very hard to be positive, but I was sinking. I refused help, I didn’t want to talk about it and I certainly didn’t want any more medication.

Fast forward to 2018, six years since those first depressive episodes and I was still feeling depressed. I’d gone through two major surgeries very close together, came out with a stoma, struggled with my body image and was starting a new job. It was a stressful time and I was not coping. I needed help.

There are lots of emotions experienced by those who live with IBD, both positive and negative. Depression and anxiety come up often on patient surveys from various sources, rates of depression are higher among IBD patients as compared to the general population.Helen Blog

The balancing act of IBD and Depression

Depression is a serious mood disorder that causes feelings of sadness and loss of interest. Depression can make you feel exhausted, worthless, helpless, and hopeless. It can also make dealing with daily tasks difficult. Tasks associated with managing a chronic illness may even feel insurmountable.

Depression often gets worse if it is not treated. IBD specialists are encouraged to assess not just the physical symptoms, but also the emotional symptoms. These can be:

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood
  • Feelings of hopelessness, negativity
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, helplessness
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and activities that were once enjoyed, including sex
  • Decreased energy, fatigue, being “slowed down”
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering or making decisions
  • Insomnia, early-morning awakening, or oversleeping
  • Loss of appetite, weight loss, or overeating and weight gain
  • Restlessness and irritability

Depression is treatable. It is important to seek out a counsellor who has experience in treating people who live with chronic illness. And while it can take some time for the symptoms of depression to go away, seeking treatment can help improve your mood, your quality of life, and your ability to cope with IBD.

This can be in the form of Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) – an evidence-based treatment for depression and anxiety, it works to identify and change negative thought patterns and behaviours which can contribute to depression – or medication management which can be used in addition to therapy.

How to handle depression when you’re chronically ill

  • Talk to like-minded people – this could be online, at a support group or your friends.
  • Keep a journal – getting your thoughts out of your head can be very taxing but ultimately therapeutic.
  • Take your prescribed medication regularly.
  • Remember there is no shame in needing or taking medication to cope with your symptoms.
  • Be active – whether this is running or going to the gym, even something as simple as a regular walk can help: being outside and feeling grounded – literally – can lessen some of the symptoms of depression.
  • If you are having a crisis, please seek medical attention. Be proactive and pick up the phone.
  • Don’t expect to “snap out of it.” Instead, expect to feel a little better each day.
  • Ask for and accept help from your family and friends.
  • Know that positive thinking will eventually replace negative thinking as your depression responds to treatment.

fullsizeoutput_1edfRemember that feeling better takes time, and that your mood will likely improve gradually, not immediately.

Connect with Louise on social media:

Facebook: Louise Helen Hunt

Instagram: @louisehelenhunt

Twitter: @louisehelenhunt

 

Taking on IBD one step at a time: Getting empowered through Team Challenge

One of the many benefits of getting involved with the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation is finding people locally who understand and live your reality. I became friends with a woman named Angie last year. facebook_1529431731870She’s a resilient person with a positive attitude. Her energy is contagious. This week, a guest post about her involvement with Team Challenge and how it’s enabled her to find community not just in St. Louis, but throughout the United States. I’ll allow Angie to take it away…

My journey began with inflammatory bowel disease began in April 2011. For me, symptoms went from non-existent to emergency surgery within a month of first waking up with cramps and diarrhea. I had been a healthy active person up to that point and I was a month shy of my 46th birthday.

I was first diagnosed with ulcerative colitis, but that diagnosis was later changed to Crohn’s disease. Due to reoccurring abscesses, my GI doctor ordered some additional tests that showed I have Crohn’s. When I was first diagnosed with IBD, I had never heard of Crohn’s disease. There was so much to learn and absorb, but I was so sick, it was hard to take it all in. My emergency surgery resulted in a total colectomy. I had a perforated bowel in 4 places. Once the surgeon opened me up, he discovered things were much worse than he expected and I had sepsis. Those early days in the hospital were hard, but I was committed to staying positive and hopeful.

One of my favorite ways to stay active had always been power walking. If I could walk somewhere vs getting in my car and driving there, that was my path of least resistance. So, getting to a point where I felt well enough to get back to exercising was a goal of mine. Ironically when I first asked my doctor when he thought I’d be well enough to power walk again, he recommend I not walk too far because he knew I’d probably need to use the restroom. In those first couple years living with Crohn’s, I was taking 20+ pills a day and probably using the restroom 30+ times a day. I was fragile and got short winded quickly, even walking to the corner in my neighborhood was a challenge.  I stayed hopeful that brighter days were ahead. I was very fortunate to have a very supportive group of friends and family around me.

Fast forward to the fall of 2015. I was feeling much stronger since being on Humira for about a year. facebook_1529431766690I saw a post on Facebook about Team Challenge and an upcoming Rock and Roll Marathon and Half Marathon that was taking place in February 2016 in New Orleans. I didn’t hesitate to sign up and commit to doing a Half Marathon and fundraising to find a cure for Crohn’s & Colitis. Almost immediately, one of my childhood girlfriends decided she was going to do the Half with me and she too joined Team Challenge. I’m not sure we knew what we were getting into, but we were 100 percent committed. Two ladies, soon to be 50, and neither had even done a 10K, let alone a Half Marathon! In full disclosure, we always knew we were going to walk, not run the Half. We might be crazy, but as they say, we were only “Half Crazy”!

Team Challenge has been one of the best decisions of my life. It has been a truly life changing experience. I am about to start training for my third Team Challenge race taking place in November in Savannah, GA. Team Challenge is a few hundred people who share one common goal, which is to find a cure for IBD. Once you sign up, you commit to a fundraising goal, but Team Challenge provides the coaching and training to not only complete the race, but to reach your goal and have fun along the way.

Race weekend is amazing! There are opportunities throughout the weekend to meet with your individual team, as well as the entire Team Challenge family. The night before the race there is an inspirational pasta dinner.

The evening is filled with tears of joy and we celebrate our combined mission of finding a cure. Some are parents running or walking for a child, some are friends and family running in memory of a loved one lost, and some are like me – a Crohn’s patient determined to not let Crohn’s hijack her life!

My advice to anyone looking to feel empowered against IBD would be to get involved with Team Challenge. I have made so many new friends and I’ve gained so much confidence through my involvement. I guarantee you’ll leave race weekend with a feeling of accomplishment and you’ll feel the love from the Team Challenge tribe that is now an extended family and support system of your own.

Click here to learn more about how you can get involved with Team Challenge.

Finding strength through your IBD tribe

Back in the fall, I had the privilege of sharing the stage with a fellow IBD advocate in the St. Louis area during a Crohn’s and Colitis event. Her name is Kelli Young. Kelli has battled Crohn’s disease for 28 years. She’s a veteran to the game, and has incredible perspective about how IBD not only shapes our lives, but dictates the kind of people we become. This week—a guest post from Kelli about why finding your tribe—an empathetic support system—makes a world of difference.

It took over a year and a half of being prodded and poked in every orifice of my body to receive the diagnosis of Crohn’s. I received the devastating news eight days before entering my sophomore year in college. IMG_1076The excitement of knowing “I’m not a hypochondriac” was overshadowed by the fear of having a “poop disease”. You see, my first year of college, I became best friends with my Suite mate. Ironically, she too battles Crohn’s. I was 20 years old, diagnosed with a disease that had no cause and therefore no cure…how can that be? Why me? What am I going to do?  I didn’t even know how to swallow a pill. I was never the sick kid! Now, I had to take 24 pills a day, which sometimes would take me an entire hour to swallow one dose, throw up, re-swallow again. Three times a day. It was as if I had entered “hell”.IMG_1077

Six month after diagnosis, I came home from college for winter break.  Tipping the scale at a whopping 75 pounds, my body was too weak to undergo surgery. For 45 long days, I received all my nutrition through an IV. This was so my bowel could rest as I prepared for a colon resection. The surgery was my only hope for living a more productive life.

What I’ve learned after nearly 30 years with IBD

Fast forward nearly three decades—and through the years, I’ve been labeled as “the complicated” patient. I’ve undergone multiple surgeries which include: three colon resections, gall bladder removal, appendectomy, countless ERCP’s and fistula repair. Can’t forget the life-saving blood transfusion I needed after my colon ruptured, causing me to lose half my blood volume. I dealt with TPN (Total parenteral nutrition)/bowel rest for each of the three surgeries. 45 days was my longest duration on NPO(no food). 30 days was my longest hospital visit. For the last 28 years, my body has had medication dumped in it.

My generation was taught differently. IMG_1078Which made my journey with the disease a little different than today. I was raised to think “only the weak complain!”  “Someone always has it worse!”  “Suck it up butter cup”.  “If you want the job done right, do it yourself”. This made me look at the situation as this was “my” disease, “my” problem and I don’t want to make anyone worry about me or feel sorry for me!  I became a master at hiding the disease and a master at hiding the byproducts of the disease.

It has taken me decades to evolve. Six years ago, I realized, I had to create a better “village” for myself. And my voice was starting to be heard. I just wanted my peeps to treat me as an equal, no matter how many bowel movements I’ve had that day. And most importantly, yearning for support and compassion, not to be mistaken for pity or despair! During my evolution process, big sacrifices had to be made. As a mother of two, I had more than just myself to think about.

The power of transparency

Today, transparency has set me free. Free from the misconception that I’m “lazy”. Free from the labels placed on me because of my thin statured frame. Free from the worry of how others view me. And free to live my life.

Today, I am able to share my journey with an audience that might share a similar experience or with an audience that has a loved one with Crohn’s Disease. I share my story, with the hope of inspiring others and showing anything is possible.

My disease has made me who I am today. It has taught me that I am strong, determined, confident and secure. kelliI’m a proud mother to two amazing children. I carried and gave birth to both of them with zero complications. I’m a business owner of a successful insurance agency, which I established 4 years after diagnosis. I didn’t allow my disease to derail my professional aspirations. I’m an active mother and manage to find time to be a room mother and Girl Scout cookie manager.

As a patient advocate, I serve on the board of the MidAmerica Chapter of the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation, in addition to other professional boards. I value the good days! I reflect on my bad days and listen when my body tells me to slow down and get rest.

My advice to you

If you’re newly diagnosed or in the thick of the battle, it’s important that you realize… “this is your normal”. Embrace it! Accept it! Own it! Speak about it!!  Get a “village” that gives you positive support, not to be mistaken for negative attention. If I can get thru this crazy game of life with Crohn’s disease, so can you!  Don’t let the disease define you.

While I know my journey will include the daily struggles from the disease, it no longer is my hidden secret. My village knows and loves me for me. They understand the disease and ask questions to understand it better. This is not just my “problem” any more. As we all patiently wait for a cure, it is important we speak up, join together and help one another.

Hospital bag essentials: What to pack & where to find it

If you battle inflammatory bowel disease, chances are, along that journey you’ve been blindsided by a flare that sends you to the hospital. One of the hardest things to do is try and pack a bag for the hospital while you’re doubled over in pain and can’t think straight. This week, a guest post from my friend, and fellow IBD advocate, Amanda Osowski. IMG_2499Amanda shares the hospital bag “must haves,” so you can be prepared the next time around. Amanda, take it away…

As a Crohn’s patient, my often urgent, sometimes frequent trips to the hospital used to leave me wondering how I could better prepare for these moments, when they arrive.

For several years, I have been keeping a mostly packed hospital bag. Today, I operate off a combination of a mostly pre-packed duffle bag, along with a note on my phone of a few items to add to the bag before I head to the hospital. This has allowed me to feel slightly more in control of the times my body does not cooperate.

Steps for filling a pre-packed hospital bag:

  1. Start by finding a good duffle bag. I have found that ones with internal/external/side pockets are best for me to keep things organized. (This is mine!) Often bags used for working out/the gym are good candidates for this purpose based on size. Amazon has many options, and stores like Marshalls/T.J. Maxx often have name brand bags for inexpensive prices.
  2. Records:
    1. Keep a printed list of current medications, supplements, allergies, doctors and their contact information. This is much easier to reference in the ER or in-patient with multiple doctors rounding.
    2. Have a printed copy of any medical documentation from your providers – especially if you have a port, picc or central line, an ostomy, feeding tube, or other medical devices/necessities. I also store these on my cell phone, so I have a mobile copy.
    3. Share with your parents/spouse/friends where this bag is kept, in case you are unable to grab it before becoming admitted.

Essentials

  • 3-5 pairs of underwear IMG_2495
  • 4-6 pairs of socks with grippers on the bottom. I really like yoga socks like these or these or these!
  • Flip flops or slide shoes or slippers with grippers on the bottom (for leaving the room).
  • Glasses/Case or Contacts/Case, including cleaner wipes/solution
  • Hand Sanitizer / Wipes
  • Lysol Spray
  • Pen/pad of paper or notebook
  • Phone charger
    • I would recommend either purchasing an extra 6ft. or 10ft. cord on Amazon to keep in your bag, or purchasing an extension cord to help with outlets that are in inconvenient places
    • Also – wall plugs like this that have the ability to charge more than one item at a time are great.
  • Ear plugs (in case of roommates or beeping IVs!) – I like these or these
  • Eye masks (to sleep w/lights) – This one is my favorite.
  • Hard candies to suck on/throat lozenges for dry throat

Clothes:

Note: I don’t have a ton of clothes that I like/find comfy, and because I often want my favorite items when I’m in the hospital, I usually keep these on my “To Add” list (see below)

  • 2-3 Comfortable bottoms (PJ pants, shorts, leggings, sweatpants) – loose fitting is best
  • 1-2 Zip up sweater/sweatshirt/fleece in case it’s chilly
  • (Men) 3-5 tank tops or tee shirts with loose neck/arms
  • (Women) 3-5 Tank tops with built in bra or tee shirts and sports bra with no metal

 Toiletries

  • Toothbrush/Toothpaste
  • Mouth wash
  • Deodorant
  • Hairbrush/Comb
  • Hair ties/bobby pins/elastic headbands
  • Dry Shampoo (My favorite listed here, and Target often sells travel size bottles for $5.99)
  • Shower items: shampoo/conditioner/body wash/razor
  • Lotion
  • Chapstick
  • Face wipes – these are my favorites
  • Wet wipes
  • Calmoseptine!
  • Nail file/nail clippers
  • If you’re female, tampons/pads just in case!
  • Body spray like this!

 Comfort

  • Toilet Paper (As a Crohnie – my bottom often cannot handle the hospital 1 ply)
  • Stuffed animal
  • Soft blanket (I’ve found my favorites at Marshalls or Home Goods)
  • Pillow (or your own pillow case)
  • Hair dryer (if that’s important to you after hospital showers)
  • Bathrobe (if that’s your thing – I don’t keep one in my bag)
  • Laundry bag/bag to keep dirty clothes separate from clean ones (I just keep a few plastic target bags in my duffle)
  • Kleenex/Tissues if you prefer soft ones
  • Heating pad
  • Durable/tall refillable water bottle
  • 1-2 sealed bottles of water (yourself + caregiver)
  • Photos – friends, spouses, pets. While most of us have these digitally, sometimes it’s nice to put a small frame on your hospital windowsill or nightstand

Entertainment

  • Magazines / Books – physical or downloaded to your phone/tablet IMG_2496
  • Deck of cards or small game
  • Headphones
  • Coloring book/colored pencils or crayons or markers

I use small makeup size pouches or bags to organize things together (ie: electronic related items, toiletries, etc.), and keep this all in my duffle bag, which lives in our guest room closet. This is important for me to remember, in case my husband is out of town and a friend offers to swing by our place and pick it up from me!

I mentioned my “To Add” list that I keep on my phone. Here’s what’s on it!

 To Add:

  • iPad + charger
  • Laptop + charger
  • Clothes (See above!)
  • Snacks: Including this obviously depends on your current intake abilities, or your caregivers, as well as your regular hospital’s offerings.

amandaThat’s it! If there are things on here that aren’t your jam, just leave them out or substitute with something more your style!

Connect with Amanda on social media! While she shares posts about her health adventures and patient advocacy efforts, she also share lots of other great content too!

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