When Crohn’s Tries to Stop you from Being Super Dad: How One IBD Dad Finds Balance

The IBD community is flooded with countless female advocates. I’ve recently been vocal about the need for more men to stand up, share their stories, and be a voice for the community. If you attend a conference or an IBD patient advocate event, 90 percent of the room is female, the same can be said for social media.

This is surprising since according to the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation, IBD affects men and women equally. That being said, in my experience speaking with men young and old with Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis—many tend to suffer in silence, downplay their pain, or prefer to keep to themselves about their struggles. While the disease may physically manifest itself and impact men in different ways, it’s the way many feel embarrassed to share their experience, that I wish could change. Colby and Hallie 1

This week—a guest post from Colby Reade. Colby is a husband and a dad who also has Crohn’s disease. He shares insight about his struggles to find a balance between IBD and family life, while offering helpful advice for how to be a “Super Dad” despite your illness. I’ll let him take it away…

I grew up believing my dad was a superhero. There was nothing he didn’t know or couldn’t fix. He would spend hours with my brother and me teaching us how to hit a curve ball or box out a defender on the basketball court. He worked insanely hard to help provide us with a comfortable life. He showed us what it meant to be a partner in a marriage. In my eyes, he was “Super Dad.”

For as long as I can recall, I wanted to live up to that image and a little over four years ago, I got my opportunity when my wife gave birth to our daughter. Nothing is more important to me than being a solid dad and husband. Fatherhood is undoubtedly the most rewarding experience of my life, but also the hardest thing I’ve ever chosen to tackle largely because it is so important to me to be good at it. Ethels Birthday

Unfortunately, life through us a curveball in 2017. What I thought was a case of nervous stomach from a stressful stretch at work turned out to be a Crohn’s flare that lasted 10 months. Not only was I terrified about all the symptoms (digestion issues, pain, fatigue, weight loss), but I felt myself struggling to take on the most important “job” I had.

I was too tired to play or engage when I came home from work…flopping on the ottoman in our living room, trying to pry my eyes open.

I was in pain all the time and struggled to find joy in daddy-daughter games.

I was terrified to be more than five feet from a bathroom so outings to the mall, the zoo or the beach were on hold.

OrchidIt took time and some trial and error, but as I navigate my somewhat new diagnosis, my wife and I have learned how to best monitor my symptoms to try and avoid future flares and take Crohn’s on as a family. In addition to my medical care, this includes some key strategies to how we approach parenting.

Here’s 5 ways we tackle parenting with Crohn’s:

  • Explain to your kiddo what’s going on. This has to be done age-appropriately of course, but it’s important that you don’t hide from your children that you are sick. It is not a failure to admit that you have an illness. Communicate to them that you are under the weather and need their help to adjust your usual routine until you feel better. My kiddo LOVES playing nurse and taking care of her mom or me when we are sick so we can make it into a game.
  • Create activities that don’t involve a lot of energy. While the digestive problems were hard, the fatigue was the worst for me. We started a list of low-energy activities I can do if I find myself mid-flare, such as board games, playing with my daughter’s doll house, and working on crafts.
  • Communicate with your significant other and boss. ThanksgivingMy wife is amazing and understands the physical impacts of a flare, but it’s my job to share with her if I’m feeling Crohn’s-y. Similarly, I have started a dialogue with my boss, so if I flare, I don’t have to pour every ounce of limited energy I have into work and come home completely empty.
  • Find an online community. It can be tempting when you are sick to start Googling your symptoms. This can be a big mistake with IBD because everyone’s case is different and the treatment plan for one person will be greatly different from another’s. However, engaging with an online community either on Twitter, through a Facebook group or an online forum, can be a great resource to gather measured feedback and share your experience.
  • Be kind to yourself. As modern, involved dads we put ourselves under tremendous pressure to be both provider and nurturer. When our bodies are compromised, it can feel like we are failing, weak, and less than. Whether you talk with a counselor, join a support group, or meditate… or all of the above, it’s important to find ways to remind yourself that just because your body is taking on IBD, you are still Super Dad.

You can connect with Colby on Twitter and Instagram (@colbyreade).

 

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