IBD on the College Campus: The Social Burden

Living with roommates. Having to use public bathrooms. Feeling fatigued and unable to keep up with the energy levels of your peers to study and socialize. While living with IBD while being a college student is difficult in the classroom, many may argue the struggles are even worse outside of academics. Socially, college is a time to explore, learn, and spread your wings. But, when you’re taking on an unpredictable and painful chronic illness, making plans to attend a house party on a Friday night becomes a bit more complicated.

Annie Tremain was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease her senior year of high school, so navigating the disease while starting college was a stressful whirlwind. IMG-1375She was nervous about the potential of being matched up with a roommate who wasn’t a good match.

“I felt so alone. I requested a single dorm room, felt like I was hiding because I didn’t want to use the shared bathrooms when others were around. I was adamantly opposed to a roommate because I didn’t want to have to talk to a stranger about what I was going through.”

Using a public bathroom can be adjustment for any college student, let alone someone battling IBD. Elizabeth Haney IMG-1374was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis less than one week before leaving to study abroad for three months. She says the fact the trip still happened and was so successful was a highlight of her college career. While back on campus in the States, she recalls how stressful it was prepping for colonoscopies.

“Prepping for a colonoscopy while you live in a house with three people but only have one bathroom was horrible. My mom would get me a hotel room for prep night when she could swing it financially.”

Rachel Wigell was only fourteen11886127_10153032256553321_8963053032556586310_o (1) when she became sick with IBD, so she barely had time to form a body image that didn’t include this disease. She says she was never somebody who was confident in her appearance, but having IBD didn’t help. From the prednisone “moon face” to issues with gas and continence, there have been lots of times where she felt too gross to be taken seriously.

“One trouble I had was plain old insecurity. Living in a dorm and sharing a bathroom with 20 other women isn’t fun when you’re having diarrhea multiple times a day. I was desperate to hide how “gross” I was from other women, which meant I didn’t have a support system.”

For Sydney Mouton, being immune compromised IMG_1080caused her to get sick all the time and the community bathrooms weren’t of much help.

“I was in the middle of my worst flare in college, so I had a lot of issues from medication side effects that were more difficult to deal with while in school and trying to have a social life.”

Couple the stress of the living situation with the fatigue that’s brought on from the disease and it can be incredibly challenging. So many students living with IBD have shared with me the difficulty of wanting to be “normal” and like everybody else but then having to deal with the extreme health consequences that generally result from a “fun” night out.

Sarah Kate struggled with handling the unknown of the disease, while trying to help her friends understand her situation.IMG-1376

“Not knowing when I am going to feel well and having to explain to friends and them not really understanding why I felt well yesterday and why I’m not well today.”

Tips for students to calm the social stress

Be candid with your friends and open about your situation. The more you communicate, the better educated those around you will be. If people show lack of compassion or disinterest, that tells you right off the bat that their friendship is not worth your time and effort. Seek out friends who have your back, genuinely. Rather than downplaying your struggles and pain, paint a clear picture to those around you so they can support you and understand the nature of your experiences.

Give yourself plenty of time to get to and from class and social outings. Scout out the best places to have a safe, quiet rest. Pad your course schedule and extracurriculars so you don’t burn yourself out. Try to schedule your classes no earlier than 9 a.m. so you’re able to get plenty of rest each night.

Check out dorms on campus with private bathrooms. During my college experience, I lived in a quad my freshman year and lived with two roommates my sophomore year. I always had a private bathroom. Seek our dorms with these options available. The privacy and comfort will be invaluable.

Weigh the pros and the cons of a night out. If alcohol doesn’t agree with you, don’t push yourself just to try and fit in. You can still go out and have a great time and limit the amount of alcohol you ingest. It’s more fun to be hanging out with others and being sober than it is to be back at the dorm or in the hospital because you put your health in jeopardy.

If you’re struggling, don’t hesitate to reach out to the college counseling center on campus. As isolated and alone as you may feel in the moment, always know there is support available for you both near and far.

Click here for IBD on the College Campus: Getting the Medical Logistics in Check

Click here for IBD on the College Campus: The Challenge of Academics

 

 

IBD on the College Campus: Getting the Medical Logistics in Check

Moving away from home and embarking on a college career is bittersweet. You’re excited. You’re anxious. You’re curious. So many emotions. The world is your oyster and you quickly discover what a small fish you are in this big world. For those entering college with an IBD diagnosis, life comes with many more challenges and fears. Medical concerns are a biggie. You are often forced to find an entirely new GI and care team that is local, in case you flare. You may have always counted on your parents to do your injections, now you may have to do them on your own. If you get infusions, you’ll need to find a new place to receive your medication, that may be out of your comfort zone and be complicated due to your course schedule.

That lack of comfort and consistency in care with a GI you know and have built trust with can be a scary chapter in your patient journey. IMG-0902Jennifer Badura’s son was diagnosed with Crohn’s while in high school. As a parent, she found her son’s transition to college challenging.

“It’s difficult to find a new place for getting lab work completed and a new place for infusions. Getting insurance, prior approvals, etc. along with the unknowns and anxiety about going to a new place for treatments and trying to get everything scheduled is tough.”

Dr Fu

Nancy Fu, BSc.(Pharm). MD. MHSc. FRCP(c), University of British Columbia

is a GI based in Vancouver, with research interests in IBD, infection and adolescent transition. She recommends making sure your primary GI connects you with a GI close to where you are attending school in case a flare requires urgent assessment.

“As a GI who sees adolescents, I make sure I am at least electronically available for my patients via texts or emails. Studies have shown young adults prefer to communicate via email as opposed to over the phone.”

Other recommendations that may be of help to you:

Get acclimated. Set up an appointment with a GI local to campus over the summer months or at the beginning of the school year, so you can build a solid relationship with a new physician. Keep your “hometown” GI’s number in your phone in case you’re flaring, hospitalized, or if your current GI has a question. hospital-840135_1920Use the patient portal to your advantage. Never hesitate to reach out if you have a question or medical issue going on. Listen to your body’s signals and don’t wait until it’s too late.

Make sure you remain compliant and manage your disease. Have enough medication on hand and have a game plan in place for how you’ll receive refills—whether it’s your parents bringing your prescriptions to you, mailing them to you, or you physically picking your medication up from a nearby pharmacy. laboratory-313864_1920Set reminders in your phone or utilize apps that track your symptoms and whether you’ve taken your medication.

Keep your prescriptions in a safe, undisclosed place. Let’s keep it real. Chances are there will be someone on your floor or even a roommate who may want to get their hands on your prescriptions, specifically your pain medications. Don’t flaunt them. Keep them hidden. Count your pills each day if you need to.

Discover local support and build a new support community. Being away from home and away from your personal support network is daunting. Check out the local Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation chapter near your campus and connect with local people who understand your reality. See if new friends from campus want to join you for a local IBD charity event. Not only will this be uplifting for you, but it will open their eyes and give them a bit of perspective about what life with IBD entails.

Click here to check out IBD on the College Campus: The Challenge of Academics.

IBD on the College Campus: The Challenge of Academics

You’re sitting in class. The abdominal pain starts drowning out the words your professor is saying. You have the urge to go to the bathroom, but you’re embarrassed because you literally just got back to your seat from excusing yourself minutes before. You’re struggling. E85DEFFBEA08446AAED0650FA09CCB0DYour disease is making the simple task of sitting in class alongside your peers an ordeal. While you may feel alone in this moment, thousands of college students around the world living with IBD can relate to this overwhelming stress and strain.

When I put a call out on Twitter and asked the IBD community what worries and challenges impacted college students, here are some of the responses I received pertaining to academics:

“Trying to balance wanting to do well vs. taking care of myself. I would try to push past a flare to study or go to class and would end up in the hospital (15+ ER visits and 5-6 hospital stays). In the long run, pushing past it was not the best idea. IMG-0787Balance is key. Health comes first,” said Aaron Blocker, a Crohn’s patient and IBD advocate. “It sucks to have to pause college because of your health, but school will always be there, and your health is important for long-term success.”

Kristin Harris has ulcerative colitis, one of her biggest worries was offending teachers by leaving multiple times to go to the bathroom. “Knowing I may dash out of class gave me major anxiety. I always tried to secure a seat next to the door. I was terrified I’d have to run to the bathroom during a test and that made me so anxious—which only made my symptoms worse.”

The same can be said for Rasheed Clarke. He too lives with ulcerative colitis and is a vocal advocate in our community. “Biggest worry was making it through each class without having to scoot to the bathroom. Somehow, I managed to make my bathroom trips in between classes…most of the time. I also kept spare underwear with me in case of accidents, and let’s just say I’m glad I did.”

Breaking down your walls and being open with professors

Similar to personal relationships and friendships, those on campus can only offer support and help to you if they are aware you have IBD. By openly communicating with your school’s disability office and getting the proper accommodations in place, along with informing your professors, you set yourself up for greater success.

“The hardest part for me was sharing a letter written by my GI with my professors explaining my medical situation and requesting classroom accommodations. IMG-0789As a straight A student, now struggling to pass classes due to an awful flare, I was devastated that I needed to ask for help. I was appreciative of my professors’ extreme kindness and that I was granted accommodations (deadline extensions, attending a different lecture on bad days, rescheduling exams, etc). This was a profound moment that taught me it was okay to ask for help,” said ulcerative colitis patient and IBD advocate, Jenna Ziegler.

Alex Beaudoin was diagnosed with Crohn’s during her academic career. She learned the benefits of communicating with professors. “I was shocked at how understanding everyone was. IMG-0788Ask for extra time, ask for a note taker. Get in touch with your school’s office for those with disabilities. Access the support you need to be on equal ground.”

Key accommodations to discuss with your school’s disability office

As people living with IBD, most of us strive to overcome our personal limitations. At the same time, it’s important to understand your achievements and accomplishments are not diminished when you ask for help and assistance. If anything, accommodations will help you reach your goals and get to where you want to be.

According to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (as well as the Americans with Disabilities Act), public, government-funded institutions such as state and regional colleges and vocational programs, are required to make reasonable modifications and adaptations for students with disabilities that significantly impact their education, learning, or physical ability to participate in programs. Click here to learn more about disability services and your rights as an IBD patient. This pertains to all school-age children and adults, click here to check out the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundations Guide to Educational Equality.

I asked for disability accommodations which at my school, last one year and then you’re re-evaluated by their social worker for whatever your needs might be. For me, in writing-intensive classes, I was allowed extra time to submit papers. For classes with exams, I received extra time to complete the exam. IMG-7331I also can use the bathroom frequently without question, eat in class without any questions and I’m allowed more than the usual 2 absences allowed in most classes,” said Tina Aswani Omprakash, Crohn’s patient and IBD advocate. “If there are group projects and I can’t partake; I ask the professor if I can do something on my own.”

The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation’s Mid-America Chapter is gearing up to a host a webinar tomorrow (Thursday, September 26, 2019) from 7-8 pm CT to address managing IBD while furthering your education along with finding the appropriate accommodations. Click here to register and stay tuned for Part Three of my series “IBD on the College Campus” next week.

IBD on the College Campus: Upcoming Webinar about Disease Management and Accommodations

Studying for finals. Living away from home. Having to use public bathrooms at the dorms. Eating cafeteria food that triggers symptoms. Dealing with professors who aren’t empathetic. Trying to keep up with your social life and your peers. Being away from the care team you know and trust for your medical needs. EA778869379446A38695A402A3CA2CDCConstantly stressing about academics, friendships, relationships, and managing a chronic illness for which there is no cure. This is life with IBD on the college campus.

“Lucky” for me, I didn’t start experiencing Crohn’s symptoms until second semester of my senior year of college at Marquette University. At the time, I just thought the late-night Taco Bell runs were catching up with me. I ended up being diagnosed with Crohn’s two months after receiving my journalism degree.

It’s a chapter of life that is a coming of age and a fresh start for many, but IBD can complicate the experience greatly. The disease has a way of shattering dreams, delaying goals, changing timelines, and ruling our lives. But our community is resilient and strong. Despite the pain and the worries, many of us choose to push through, find a way to make a detour, and do what’s best to bring us happiness.

The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation’s Mid-America Chapter is gearing up to a host a webinar Thursday, September 26 from 7-8 pm CT to address managing the disease while furthering your education along with finding the appropriate accommodations so you have the help you need to make it through. 6921B871464A4F6E8FE7D218A1A3F575Dr. Yezaz Ghouri, MD from the University of Missouri School of Medicine, along with IBD Patient, Ryleigh Murray, will be hosting the discussion. Ryleigh is currently a graduate student studying public affairs at the University of Missouri. Click here to register for the webinar.

“When entering college, you never expect your IBD to impact your education, until it does. Establishing care with a GI doctor in your college town, managing your medications, diet and stress can make a big difference in how you feel and how much you learn. IMG_0717Registering with the Disability Center on your campus and receiving accommodations allows yourself to increase your success rate within higher education. Early registration, extended test time and closer parking to your classes are just a couple simple requests that can impact your education for the better,” said Ryleigh.

College years are some of the most exciting times for young people who are given the opportunity for the first time in their life to be independent and self-sufficient. But the transition doesn’t come without its challenges.

Dr. Ghouri says, “Patients who are of college age are forced to decide what type of diet works for them and what hurts them, learn to administer medications themselves including shots and sometimes finding a location where they can receive IV infusions. It is crucial to be compliant with the treatment plan and important to seek out help from a nearby GI specialist to monitor their disease, thereby preventing flares and complications from IBD.”

During the webinar you can expect to learn about coping with IBD on college campuses and about the assistance that is available to those living with Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis. university-105709_1920

In the weeks ahead, I will dig deeper into this issue on my blog (Lights, Camera, Crohn’s). Since tapping into the IBD family and patient community on social media, I’ve come to realize how much interest, how many questions, and how important the need for support and conversation is pertaining to what life is like for college students (and even professors!) living with IBD. Stay tuned!