IBD on the College Campus: Upcoming Webinar about Disease Management and Accommodations

Studying for finals. Living away from home. Having to use public bathrooms at the dorms. Eating cafeteria food that triggers symptoms. Dealing with professors who aren’t empathetic. Trying to keep up with your social life and your peers. Being away from the care team you know and trust for your medical needs. EA778869379446A38695A402A3CA2CDCConstantly stressing about academics, friendships, relationships, and managing a chronic illness for which there is no cure. This is life with IBD on the college campus.

“Lucky” for me, I didn’t start experiencing Crohn’s symptoms until second semester of my senior year of college at Marquette University. At the time, I just thought the late-night Taco Bell runs were catching up with me. I ended up being diagnosed with Crohn’s two months after receiving my journalism degree.

It’s a chapter of life that is a coming of age and a fresh start for many, but IBD can complicate the experience greatly. The disease has a way of shattering dreams, delaying goals, changing timelines, and ruling our lives. But our community is resilient and strong. Despite the pain and the worries, many of us choose to push through, find a way to make a detour, and do what’s best to bring us happiness.

The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation’s Mid-America Chapter is gearing up to a host a webinar Thursday, September 26 from 7-8 pm CT to address managing the disease while furthering your education along with finding the appropriate accommodations so you have the help you need to make it through. 6921B871464A4F6E8FE7D218A1A3F575Dr. Yezaz Ghouri, MD from the University of Missouri School of Medicine, along with IBD Patient, Ryleigh Murray, will be hosting the discussion. Ryleigh is currently a graduate student studying public affairs at the University of Missouri. Click here to register for the webinar.

“When entering college, you never expect your IBD to impact your education, until it does. Establishing care with a GI doctor in your college town, managing your medications, diet and stress can make a big difference in how you feel and how much you learn. IMG_0717Registering with the Disability Center on your campus and receiving accommodations allows yourself to increase your success rate within higher education. Early registration, extended test time and closer parking to your classes are just a couple simple requests that can impact your education for the better,” said Ryleigh.

College years are some of the most exciting times for young people who are given the opportunity for the first time in their life to be independent and self-sufficient. But the transition doesn’t come without its challenges.

Dr. Ghouri says, “Patients who are of college age are forced to decide what type of diet works for them and what hurts them, learn to administer medications themselves including shots and sometimes finding a location where they can receive IV infusions. It is crucial to be compliant with the treatment plan and important to seek out help from a nearby GI specialist to monitor their disease, thereby preventing flares and complications from IBD.”

During the webinar you can expect to learn about coping with IBD on college campuses and about the assistance that is available to those living with Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis. university-105709_1920

In the weeks ahead, I will dig deeper into this issue on my blog (Lights, Camera, Crohn’s). Since tapping into the IBD family and patient community on social media, I’ve come to realize how much interest, how many questions, and how important the need for support and conversation is pertaining to what life is like for college students (and even professors!) living with IBD. Stay tuned!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s