Chronic Illness & Finances: 5 Steps for Improving Your Financial Health

For most of us, the words “personal finance” feel scary. Scary in the way IBD was right after we were diagnosed. But as we learned more, those butterflies lessened. This is also true for money and personal finance. The feeling that makes us want to turn away because it seems too complicated, too intense, too painful, and too scary go away with a bit of knowledge and a few simple habits.

This is where 27-year-old Annelise Bretthauer, CFP®, of Oregon comes in. Annelise was diagnosed with Crohn’s in March 2017. Just like all of us, she is a lot more than just a patient. Annelise is newly married and she’s a financial planner. Get this—her professional focus is to help families manage chronic disease! How perfect is that. 190809_Annelise_M_0211Her goal for you today is to walk away feeling better equipped when it comes to money saving know-how and a bit more empowered. I’ll let her take it away…

The keys to financial stability are a dash of planning, a positive money mindset and a system that helps you stick to positive habits, which allow you to achieve your goals. Creating financial stability is an impactful way to reduce your stress and save energy for other things that fill your healing cup. Let’s jump in!

Step #1: Take a few moments to ask yourself, what are my closely held beliefs about money? Are these beliefs limiting my progress?

A couple examples are: I don’t understand financial things, I am not good with money, money is evil, I am only secure when I have lots of money, money is scary or maybe, I love money, money flows easily to me. stil--837JygbCJo-unsplashThere is no right or wrong. What is coming up for you? It doesn’t need to make perfect sense, it’s just to get your mind thinking about how you view money. Share these sentiments in a journal or planner.

Step #2: Write yourself a positive money and health affirmation on a sticky note. 

This looks different for everyone. Most of us have negative beliefs about money, but some of us don’t! If that’s the case for you, that’s okay too. Design this affirmation to help you build wealth in a way that inspires you. Put it on your mirror and say it out loud right before you brush your teeth each morning and evening.

A couple examples are: I am worthy of prosperity, I have the power to protect my health while earning plenty of money, each day I become healthier and wealthier.

Step #3: Develop a simple spending plan. 

The simplest way to do this is to take out a piece of paper or a note on your phone, write down how much money you take home, subtract how much you want/can save and what’s left can be allocated to your expenses. The key is to set up an automatic transfer to your savings account on the day you get paid, so you don’t have to think about it.

Step #4 (a piggyback on #3): Create a savings account that is just for managing your health and automate your savings to it each month on the day you get paid. michael-longmire-lhltMGdohc8-unsplash

This can be a game changer. When money is already set aside for your health, it helps alleviate the energy and stress that comes with the cost of managing our IBD.

Step #5: Create a habit of Financial Planning Saturday. And a system to help you stick to it!

This is a simple weekly 10-minute check-in with yourself (or your partner) to look at your bank accounts and check your credit card balance. Decide how you will adjust next week if you need to.

Ask yourself, how will I create a system that makes it easy for me to remember to do it? For example, if you always do yoga on Saturday morning, make it a routine to do your planning meeting right after. Or set an alarm on your phone as a reminder.

Bonus Tip: Set yourself 6-month and 12-month health and wealth goals. Write it down in a planner or journal, then take it out each Financial Planning Saturday and check your progress. Give yourself grace and commend yourself for showing up. If you keep showing up, you will meet your goals, even if it takes longer than you’d like. kyle-glenn-_AR74EoWdy0-unsplash

If you don’t think of yourself as a money person. Let’s change that! All people are money people. Financial planning is not just for those who have already built wealth. It’s for all of us. As chronic disease IBD warriors, you have figured out so much already. Offer yourself permission to feel the fear and do it anyways. Let’s make a plan and step into the driver’s seat of our health and our wealth.

If this post sparked your curiosity, stay tuned for the launch of www.Kauviara.com. Annelise is working on courses (which will be free as a Lights, Camera, Crohn’s reader) and a Financial Guide Planner.190809_Annelise_M_0108

You can follow Annelise here:

Instagram: @annelisebretthauer

Facebook: Annelise Bretthauer

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