“So, You Have an Ostomy”: Tips for Travel, Diet, and Bag Changes—Part 2

Navigating life with an ostomy takes patience and persistence. The adjustment is not only emotionally and mentally taxing for many, but the physical day-to-day takes some getting used to as well. In Part 2 of “So, You Have An Ostomy,” I interviewed ostomates about everything from diet, to bag changes, and how best to pack when you’re away from home. It’s my hope that by hearing these words of wisdom, that you’ll feel better equipped and more at ease should you need to make these lifestyle changes for yourself.

Discovering Your “New” Diet with an Ostomy

After ostomy surgery, it’s recommended to stick to a low residue diet for about six-eight weeks. Once you reach that point in recovery, work with your surgeon and GI dietitian to reintroduce foods one by one to see how you tolerate them. Hydration is key every single day. When you are outdoors or more active, you will want to make sure you hydrate before, during, and after, not only with water, but having some sodium and sugar in your system for better absorption. This can either be a homemade mixture, powders (ex. DripDrop, Liquid I.V.), or premade drinks (ex. Pedialyte, Metamucil Water, or Gatorade). Ultimately, you want to keep a pudding consistency of output.

If you’re eating high fiber foods like nuts and raw veggies and fruits, ensure you are chewing well, eating a bit slower, and drinking water throughout the meal, as these foods are harder to breakdown.

Sahara Fleetwood-Beresford, 32, of the United Kingdom, was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis at age 19. Since then, she’s had three stomas. When it comes to diet with an ostomy, it’s very much trial and error, like it is with IBD. For many, marshmallows, unsweetened applesauce, and peanut butter are the ‘go-to’s’ to thicken output, but unfortunately those don’t do the trick for Sahara.

“My main piece of advice is not to be afraid of trying things. If you chew thoroughly, that minimizes the risk of blockages. Your stoma will be settling in for up to twelve months, so if something doesn’t agree with you in the beginning, try it again later. My diet is healthy now, thanks to my stoma. I can eat all of the fruits and vegetables that I couldn’t eat before due to pain caused by strictures.”

Karin Thum, 42, of Florida, battles not only Crohn’s disease, but Spina Bifida. She says an ostomy isn’t as bad as it seems and that in time, you’ll find it’s the best thing you could have done for your health and your quality of life. When it comes to her top dietary hack she says, “I’m a salad girl. I learned from my doctor to use scissors to cut up lettuce so that it’s easier to digest. This way I don’t have to give up eating salad completely and can enjoy one of my favorite foods in moderation.”

For Andrew Battifarano, 26, of New York, he noticed he has higher output after having a sugary drink, like soda. Steering clear of these has helped his bag from filling up so quickly.

“At the same time, I try and have as much water I can tolerate. You can easily get dehydrated without even realizing it (I have and it’s not fun), so staying on top of that is super important. And eating less at night, or having smaller meals spread out will make you have less output when you’re sleeping, which might help prevent any leaks and also let you sleep longer without having to get up during the night.”

Tim Albert, 32, of Wisconsin, received his ostomy this past November. If he ever feels dehydrated, he swears by DripDrop ORS. He says if he drinks 16 ounces of water with DripDrop he starts feeling better in 30 minutes.

“As far as output, I’ve learned to think of things the same way a diabetic might manage their blood sugar. If I eat something that will water down my output, I need to counter it with something that will thicken it. Foods are going to be different for each person, but for me, I am able to thicken things up with apple sauce. I like to buy the little pouches; they are great for on the go.”

Sarah Byrd Vihlen, 33, of Georgia was initially diagnosed with ulcerative colitis in January 2014, but has since been switched to Crohn’s. She underwent subtotal-colectomy surgery right after bringing her two-year-old daughter, Penelope, into the world via c-section. Talk about a rockstar IBD mom. When it comes to diet, she says it’s very much like what you’re told with IBD.

“I typically avoid anything with large seeds or nuts, and if I do eat them, I chew thoroughly, the same with fruits and vegetables that have skin. I still do not eat popcorn. Since getting an ostomy I have been able to eat a wider variety of foods than before, but I have heard mushrooms are dangerous and I miss eating them a lot. To thicken output I eat marshmallows, rice, potatoes, and bananas.”

Some foods are known to increase output and gas. Carbonation drinks, chewing gum, and even something as simple as using a straw, can increase your gas ingestion which will need to be expelled. The challenge is, what may increase one person’s output, may not for someone else or vice versa.

Oh, The Places You Will Go…With an Ostomy

Once it’s “safe” to travel post-pandemic (can you even imagine?!), there’s a lot to keep in mind when you’re packing your bags and you have a bag. The first rule of thumb—be overly prepared and always carry-on your supplies in case your suitcase gets lost. Ostomy supplies are needed to be temperature controlled; they are permitted to go through TSA as carry-on.

Be proactive and if you need to cut your wafer, try to cut some before you travel, and pack your favorite scissors in your checked baggage. The consensus among all ostomates I spoke with—pack extra of everything. You don’t know if you’ll have a defective appliance or have any issues arise while you’re away from home.

Natasha Weinstein always considers how long she is traveling and how she is getting to her destination. She says, “I always pack for up to 3 changes a day. If I am flying, I pack a bit more, as air travel seems to affect my adhesive. I seem to do better with car travel. If I am being exposed to extreme temperatures or my itinerary is more active, I take that into account. I do everything I can to alleviate any possible stress about supplies, so I can enjoy my vacation.”

Double and triple check to ensure you have all your supplies and bag changes packed before you head out the door. An ostomy isn’t like a regular prescription; it can be impossible to find when you’re in another city and you’re simply out of luck at that point. Many of the ostomates I talked with recommend organizing your supplies in a travel toiletries holder.

For additional travel—both domestic and international—with an ostomy, check out this helpful article by ostomate, Tina Aswani Omprakash.

Ch-Ch-Ch-Changesss…the ins and outs of changing your ostomy bag

How long a bag will last varies depending on a few different factors: activity level, weather, bathing, sleeping, etc.There isn’t a one size fits all for bags, it takes a while to figure out which appliance and ‘accessories’ work best for you, that can also change over time, even after you think you have found the right one. Skin allergies are common. It’s best to get free samples from several different companies and try them out. Deodorizing & lubricating drops are also helpful.

For any new ostomates, if insurance/payment allows, it’s recommended to have an ostomy home care nurse help you through any trouble shooting with changing your bag at home.

“I don’t know what I would have done without my ostomy nurse, she was an absolute angel. She would come weekly and was able to talk me through problems I was having and give me several new tips. If that’s not available, several people on social media have videos posted. Organizing your supplies is important too so you know your inventory levels and don’t run out. I have a small stocked caddy in my bathroom ready in case I need to do a middle of the night bag change,” says Byrd.

Byrd typically changes her bag every four days, but has gone longer on occasion. Morning bag changes seem to work best for her (before she eats anything) otherwise she says you can wind up with a mess.

Lindsay Dickerson, age 30, of Georgia, was diagnosed with colonic inertia, gastroparesis (digestive tract paralysis) at the age of 17. When it comes to changing her ostomy, she says it’s key to lay out all your supplies prior to making your first move.

“Know you have everything there, so you don’t have to run to your supply closet and risk a spill. I use a grocery bag and tuck it into my waistband to collect any output and trash.  When I used the Hollister brand, I had a thousand supplies that went into a bag change. Now that I’ve switched to the Sensura Mio Convex 2-click appliance, I need the wafer, a bag, and skin-tac that helps the bag stay on longer. My Hollister (which I used for 3 ½ years) lasted two days; my Coloplast Sensura Mio lasts at least 5 days.”

Lindsay recommends always having a water bottle with you when you empty. Since output can be sludgy and hard to empty, it enables you to rinse your bag with some water after you’ve dumped it. She says this tip will change your life!

Michel Johnson, 56, of Tennessee, had a temporary ostomy for nine months. He recalls changing his bag every three to four days. At first, he said he would relive the trauma every time he had to change or empty it, but then his perspective shifted.

“I realized my ostomy saved my life. Rather than moping around, I brought a music speaker in the bathroom and created a dance playlist for my bag changes. I looked forward to it! I danced and sang while I changed my bag. Doing this completely reframed how I looked at this process.”

Several ostomates also mentioned showering bag free and what a wonderful feeling it is to not have anything attached to your body. Just remember to keep soaps and shampoos with perfume and moisturizers away from your stoma and peristomal skin, as they can cause irritation.

Jordan Ditty, 27, of California, was diagnosed with Crohn’s at age 11. When it comes to changing her bag in public, she recommends hitting up Starbucks, as they usually have single bathrooms. If you need to change your bag in public, she says it’s also helpful to use the stall with the changing table so you can lay out all your supplies. Jordan always keeps disinfectant wipes in her bag along with extra paper towels to make sure she’s able to clean the surface area and stoma well.

“You can also sample different companies supplies for free. Email them with what you are wanting to try, and they will send you 2-3 of them as well as others so you are able to find what works best for you. In the past year and a half, I have changed my pouching system at least five times if not more to find what works for my skin, activity level, daily life, and stoma.”

Overall, the recommendation—expect the unexpected. You can’t control what the stoma does, so when it’s not cooperating, try your best to go with the flow (literally and figuratively!). And don’t wait too long to change a bag. If your skin is burning underneath, it’s probably leaking, change it. If you think the adhesive is coming off your wafer and may not last sleeping through the night, change it. Overestimate the time you will need and please give yourself grace upon grace.

Stay tuned for Part 3 of “So, You Have An Ostomy…” Monday (September 28th) we’ll cover disclosing you have an ostomy on a date, intimacy, styles of clothing and underwear that work best and the unique names some IBD warriors have for their stomas.

In case you missed it, click here to read Part 1 of “So, You Have an Ostomy”—The Complexity of Coping, which focuses on what it’s like to find out you need an ostomy, the complexity of coping, and adjusting to your new normal.

3 thoughts on ““So, You Have an Ostomy”: Tips for Travel, Diet, and Bag Changes—Part 2

  1. Cindi Alexander says:

    I have had an ostomy since January 1993. In 1994 I had an illeostmy and my rectum removed. I never looked back sine I felt so much better. Besides I was so sick I really had no choice. I have doubled my weight over all these years. It doesn’t stop me from anything. I went thru a divorce and have remarried 21 years now to a wonderful man. Oh how I worried at first no one would want me but I was so wrong. If someone loves you they love you for you not for how your body looks. I take stelara now for my Crohn’s. I have had it since 1977. I am 67 years old and for the most part I feel good and don’t really remember life w/o an ileostomy. I would say the only down side is when you get a faulty bag or have problems with breakthrough. Mostly because of embarrassment. People do understand.

    Like

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