My top 5 wishes for those with IBD

As we bid farewell to 2018 there is much to reflect on. Each year brings new experiences, relationships and opportunities. Some years leave more of an imprint on our memory and on our heart, than others. When you think back on the past 365 days what were the highlights? What were the low points?

IMG_4926For me—the past nine months I’ve been incredibly grateful to have another healthy pregnancy, that silenced my Crohn’s symptoms. I’m also celebrating 3.5 years of no IBD-related hospitalizations or ER visits! The cherry on top was the release of Citrate-free (pain-free) Humira this year! After more than a decade of giving myself the painful injection, the new formula has greatly improved my patient experience.

Here are my 5 wishes for you in the days ahead:

  1. Strength through difficult days

There’s no telling when the next flare will strike. We all know it’s not a matter of if, but when. When the going gets tough, take it one hour, one moment at a time. Try not to overwhelm yourself with worry. Go to your happy place and think back to past flares and all the hurt and pain you’ve overcome. Use the moments of your journey from the past that have tested you the most, to serve as your greatest source of empowerment. As the years go by, and your diagnosis seems like a different lifetime, use that to your advantage.

  1. Management of your symptoms

Remission is something that is possible, but there’s no telling how long it will last or for some, if it will ever become a reality. By getting your symptoms under control and well managed, whether that’s through medication, diet or both—your quality of life improves vastly. IMG_4768Celebrate the feel-good days and soak up the moments where your IBD isn’t top of mind. You have an innate sense of when your body is giving you warning signs that rough waters are ahead. Be mindful of the inner conversation going on in your head and listen to your gut. Although it tends to be our nemesis, it has a way of alerting us when things are about to get out of our control.

  1. Perspective about your experience

Use your patient journey and that of others to give you perspective. Empathize with friends and family members going through health struggles, whatever they may be. Sure, many people have it better than us, but many have it a lot worse. It’s not a competition to see who is the sickest, but rather a way of shifting our mindset and understanding that many people have struggles and we are not alone in our experiences. Like the saying goes, until you “get” a chronic illness, you don’t really “get” it.

  1. Support from those around you

Having a network of close family and friends to lean on at a moments notice plays a major role in how we take on IBD. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. Communicate the good and the bad, without fear of being judged or ridiculed. nyeblogTrust that those close to you love you and appreciate you for everything that makes you, you—including your disease. Show appreciation for your caretakers—those who live with you and are in the trenches by your side, day in and day out. Find comfort in those who allow you to be vulnerable when you need to be. Stop putting effort into relationships and friendships that don’t add joy to your life—eliminate the negativity, cut the fat, there’s no need for people who bring you down or belittle what it’s like to live with Crohn’s or ulcerative colitis.

  1. A health care team who listens

Find IBD specialists and gastroenterologists who enable you to be your own best advocate, who listen when you’re worried and address your concerns without making you feel less than or like a number. By trusting in your doctors and the care they provide you, you’ll feel much less stress about the path you are on as a patient.

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